D.A.R.E. America http://www.dare.org Empowering Children to Lead Safe and Healthy Lives Mon, 22 Dec 2014 02:55:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 Ipswich Police Officer Completes D.A.R.E. Instructor Training http://www.dare.org/ipswich-police-officer-completes-d-a-r-e-instructor-training/ http://www.dare.org/ipswich-police-officer-completes-d-a-r-e-instructor-training/#comments Mon, 22 Dec 2014 02:52:48 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16787 Pictured left-to-right are Officer Woodworth, Sgt. Kmiec, and Domenic DiNatale, Director DARE Massachusetts at Officer Woodworth’s D.A.R.E. Officer Graduation ceremony held in Concord NH. (Courtesy of the Ipswich Police department) CONCORD, N.H. — Police Chief Paul A. Nikas is pleased to report that there is a new D.A.R.E. Officer in town. Officer Aaron Woodworth recently […]

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Pictured left-to-right are Officer Woodworth, Sgt. Kmiec, and Domenic DiNatale, Director DARE Massachusetts at Officer Woodworth’s D.A.R.E. Officer Graduation ceremony held in Concord NH. (Courtesy of the Ipswich Police department)

CONCORD, N.H. — Police Chief Paul A. Nikas is pleased to report that there is a new D.A.R.E. Officer in town.

Officer Aaron Woodworth recently completed the D.A.R.E. Officer Training program at the Northern New England Training Team Regional Training Facility in Concord. The class, which was held Dec. 1-12 educated Officer Woodworth in the concepts and mission of the D.A.R.E. program and certified him to teach the program to Ipswich students.

“I believe in and fully support the D.A.R.E. program. It gives children tools to resist alcohol, tobacco, and drugs, and the most modern iteration of D.A.R.E. helps students become informed decision makers,” Chief Nikas said. “As educators, we need to give children the knowledge and tools they need to make smart, healthy decisions, and I am very proud of Officer Woodworth, our next generated D.A.R.E. officer.”

The D.A.R.E. Officer training is a rigorous and intensive two-week live-in program encompassing many subjects such as learning modalities, child development, classroom management, teaching techniques, lesson planning, team building, communication and public speaking. During D.A.R.E. Officer Training, the officers spend a great deal of time working with trained staff mentors and an educator where they learn about brain-based learning, youth culture trends, learning styles, drug information, effective questioning, active listening, and also learning and practicing the D.A.R.E. curriculum and material.

The D.A.R.E. Program was founded by Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl Gates, in 1983. The D.A.R.E. program was started in Ipswich in 1990 by now-retired Officer Donald Cole and has continued ever since. The program has been delivered to all 6th grade students in the Ipswich Middle School for the past several years.

“The D.A.R.E. program is more than just teaching students about drug and alcohol information,” said Ipswich Police Sergeant Daniel J. Kmiec, the Department’s Drug Use Prevention Coordinator. “The new “Keepin’ it Real” curriculum taught in D.A.R.E. focuses on many aspects such as decision making, risks and consequences, health effects, friendships, peer pressure, personal pressure, being confident, and ways to be in charge.”

In 2013, the Ipswich Police Department received a generous grant from the Rotary Club to expand the D.A.R.E. Program to the 7th grade as well. At present, the Department has two certified D.A.R.E. Instructors, Sergeant Kmiec who teaches the 6th grade D.A.R.E. program and newly-certified D.A.R.E. Officer Woodworth who will teach the 7th grade D.A.R.E. program.

Chief Nikas would like to thank Domenic DiNatale, Director of D.A.R.E. Massachusetts for his continued support of the D.A.R.E. Program not only in the Ipswich Schools, but statewide. Officer Woodworth’s tuition, room and board, was fully funded by D.A.R.E. Massachusetts. Chief Nikas also would like to thank the Rotary Club for their continued support of the D.A.R.E. Program in the Ipswich Public Schools.

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D.A.R.E. America Honors New York State Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman http://www.dare.org/d-a-r-e-america-honors-new-york-state-attorney-general-eric-t-schneiderman/ http://www.dare.org/d-a-r-e-america-honors-new-york-state-attorney-general-eric-t-schneiderman/#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 09:55:15 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16775 On December 10th, D.A.R.E. America hosted a benefit reception honoring Eric T. Schneiderman, New York State Attorney General. Attorney General Schneiderman was honored for his substantial interests on behalf of New York youth and efforts in reducing substance abuse. The event, hosted by John & Margo Catsimatidis, was held in New York City at the […]

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On December 10th, D.A.R.E. America hosted a benefit reception honoring Eric T. Schneiderman, New York State Attorney General. Attorney General Schneiderman was honored for his substantial interests on behalf of New York youth and efforts in reducing substance abuse. The event, hosted by John & Margo Catsimatidis, was held in New York City at the prestigious Metropolitan Club.

The event was held for the purpose of providing support for the expansion of D.A.R.E. in New York City. Event Chairs were Howard Safi, Robert J. Strang. Serving on the reception committee were: Jeff Bauml, John Castle, Margo & John Catsimatidis, Rita Cosby, Bruce Doniger, James Essey, Giorgio Kolaj, Delia & Larry Leeds, John Miller, Sherry & Skip Miller, Frank Pegueros, Lewis Rice, Howard Safir and Robert J. Strang.

Pictured left to right - Margo Catsimatidis, John Catsimatidis, Frank Pegueros, Robert J. Strang, Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman

Pictured left to right – Margo Catsimatidis, John Catsimatidis, Frank Pegueros, Robert J. Strang, Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman 

Honorees of this annual event have included: Peter Arnell, Susan M. Baer, Wayne Bennett, Michael Coan, Bridget G. Brennan, John & Margo Catsimatidis, Lyor Cohen, Steven Fisher, Hon. Rudolph W. Giuiliani, Thomas L. Harrison, Tommy Hilfiger, Alfred R. Kahn, Ken Kaess (dec.), the Kolaj Family, Michele M. Leonhart, the Livanos Family, Thomas D. Mottola, Chazz & Gianna Palminteri, Richard D Parsons, Dan Rather, Arthur Surin, Karen P. Tandy, and Anne Kalin Zehren.

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Busting the Myth That Marijuana Doesn’t Kill, in 1 Minute http://www.dare.org/busting-the-myth-that-marijuana-doesnt-kill-in-1-minute/ http://www.dare.org/busting-the-myth-that-marijuana-doesnt-kill-in-1-minute/#comments Mon, 15 Dec 2014 09:52:32 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16767 From The Daily Signal. A former adviser on drug policy to three presidents—Clinton, Bush and Obama—says, despite popular fiction, marijuana does kill. “Saying marijuana has never contributed to death or never killed anyone is like saying tobacco hasn’t killed anyone,” Kevin Sabet, president of Project SAM, told The Daily Signal after speaking at a Heritage Foundation […]

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From The Daily Signal.

A former adviser on drug policy to three presidents—Clinton, Bush and Obama—says, despite popular fiction, marijuana does kill.

“Saying marijuana has never contributed to death or never killed anyone is like saying tobacco hasn’t killed anyone,” Kevin Sabet, president of Project SAM, told The Daily Signal after speaking at a Heritage Foundation event today on marijuana policy. “In that same way, marijuana does kill people in the form of mental illness, suicide and car crashes.”

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Cocopah Tribal Police Department graduates first DARE class http://www.dare.org/cocopah-tribal-police-department-graduates-first-dare-class/ http://www.dare.org/cocopah-tribal-police-department-graduates-first-dare-class/#comments Thu, 04 Dec 2014 00:23:33 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16746 DARE Instructor and Cocopah Tribal Police Officer Jesus Verdugo reads an essay written by one of the more than 160 students from Somerton’s Tierra Del Sol Elementary school who graduated Monday afternoon from the Cocopah Tribal Police Department’s first Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) program. From Yuma Sun. More than 160 elementary school students in Somerton […]

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DARE Instructor and Cocopah Tribal Police Officer Jesus Verdugo reads an essay written by one of the more than 160 students from Somerton’s Tierra Del Sol Elementary school who graduated Monday afternoon from the Cocopah Tribal Police Department’s first Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) program.

From Yuma Sun.

More than 160 elementary school students in Somerton graduated Monday afternoon from the Cocopah Tribal Police Department’s first Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) program.

“I hope these DARE classes will remain with you for the rest of your life,” said DARE instructor and Cocopah Tribal Police Officer Jesus Verdugo. “DARE was to help educate you on the dangers of drugs, peer pressure, stress, bullying and how to overcome them.”

Verdugo, who has been with the police department for nearly five years, was himself a DARE student when he was a fifth-grader. This past summer, he became a certified DARE instructor, making him the first Cocopah police officer to serve in this capacity.

DARE’s vision statement is to create “a world in which students everywhere are empowered to respect others and choose to lead lives free from violence, substance abuse and other dangerous behaviors.”

The class Verdugo taught lasted 10 weeks and was held one day per week.

As part of the program, students wrote essays on what the program means to them and how they will use what they learned moving forward.

Verdugo presented the award-winning essay writers with a medal and the chance to take center stage with him and read their essays aloud.

The graduation ceremony kicked off at 1 p.m. at the Tierra Del Sol Elementary school auditorium, with the United States Border Patrol Honor Guard posting the flag and trumpeter Chad Bohr performing the National Anthem.

DARE was founded in 1983 by then-Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl Gates and the Los Angeles Unified School District. Since then, the DARE program has grown to become an international outreach effort, training students in countries as close as Canada to those as far away as Saipan.

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D.A.R.E. adapts to the times after Cox’s death http://www.dare.org/d-a-r-e-adapts-to-the-times-after-coxs-death/ http://www.dare.org/d-a-r-e-adapts-to-the-times-after-coxs-death/#comments Fri, 28 Nov 2014 00:55:13 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16732 From Chillicothe Gazette. CHILLICOTHE – Ten years after Chillicothe Police Officer Larry Cox was killed, the city schools’ Drug Abuse Resistance Education program is still thriving and learning to adapt to a new world of preteen and teenage communication. Cox was a DARE officer popular with students at the time of his death. The program has […]

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From Chillicothe Gazette.

Ten years after Chillicothe Police Officer Larry Cox was killed, the city schools’ Drug Abuse Resistance Education program is still thriving and learning to adapt to a new world of preteen and teenage communication.

Cox was a DARE officer popular with students at the time of his death. The program has been in the hands of Officer Julie Preston and Officer Sandy Murray since then.

“Larry was very loved by the community and the kids,” Preston said. “So I knew that I was going to have my work cut out for me. He and I both had different personalities. He did things one way, and going into a position like that with him not being alive, I didn’t know everything that he did, so I had to kind of find out along the way.”

Since taking over, Preston said the program has evolved from just drug and alcohol abuse education to anti-bullying lectures and how to navigate social media without posting something that can have a negative effect.

Preston said she thinks the program is helpful because she also is the discipline officer at the high school, which gives her more insight into how students grow with the information they learned in elementary and middle school.

“I see those kids in fifth grade, but then I see them all through high school,” Preston said. “Generally, my job at the high school is more of a discipline thing. So if the kids get in trouble, they remember me as their DARE officer, so it kind of has its advantages because I know all the kids.”

Presentations of the effects of drugs and alcohol use are not always surprising to students, Preston said.

“I think that they are more knowledgeable of what drugs are and what they do because the heroin problem is so huge here,” she said. “I think a lot of kids either know somebody or have had somebody who has died from an overdose or something like that. I think sometimes the kids see that happen and it causes them to be more aware and not want that for their life.”

The world has changed since Cox’s death, but the education he was such an integral part of remains vital, Preston said.

“We still miss Larry and remember everything that he did, but I’m glad that we still do it,” Preston said about the DARE program. “I wish he could have been here to do it himself.”

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How safe is your child’s school? http://www.dare.org/how-safe-is-your-childs-school/ http://www.dare.org/how-safe-is-your-childs-school/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 01:39:29 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16720 From whas11.com. LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) – On the surface this is a story about numbers. 22 assaults in Oldham County Schools, 452 drug offenses in Bullitt County, and 67 weapons at Jefferson County Public Schools. When you dig a little deeper, it’s a story about kids and it could be your kid. “Those numbers aren’t good,” […]

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From whas11.com.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) – On the surface this is a story about numbers. 22 assaults in Oldham County Schools, 452 drug offenses in Bullitt County, and 67 weapons at Jefferson County Public Schools. When you dig a little deeper, it’s a story about kids and it could be your kid.

“Those numbers aren’t good,” JCPS Director of Safe and Drug Free Schools Jackie Wisman said when we asked him about 2013-2014 harassment charges at a couple of Jefferson County Public Middle Schools.

“From weapons to drugs to bullying and assault we’re going to show you how to find out exactly what’s going on in your child’s school. Quite often educators would give the good news, but they wouldn’t give the full news,” Commissioner Terry Holliday from The Kentucky Department of Education said. Holiday says today the whole story is available good or bad.

Detailed information about every public school and district in the Bluegrass State is available on the Kentucky School Report Card. When asked whether some schools were safer than others John Akers from the Kentucky Center for School Safety said “Thats a very difficult question to answer.”

Akers heads up the Kentucky Center for School Safety. He says situations like the Fern Creek High school shooting in September complicate the question of school safety. They were troubling images, no question for parents. But when the I-Team looked through records at Fern Creek we discovered that was the only weapon reported there in 3 years.

“When it occurred the Fern Creek faculty and leadership were well prepared for it, they responded immediately,” JCPS Chief Academic Officer Dewey Hensley said. “Second I want parents to know we’re on this,” Hensley added.

Hensley says JCPS is a School system that reported a reduction in suspensions on the last report card.

There are concerns – like at Iroquois High School where with just 982 students 8 weapons were found on school grounds last year. Another, Thomas Jefferson Middle where based on complaints students had nearly a 45 percent chance of being bullied in the 2013-2014 school year.

Lead Counselor Michelle Sircy says some schools are doing a better job reporting. And that doesn’t necessarily make it a less safe school. “That’s what we’re telling them to do, we want them to report. We want to be involved so we can help solve some of those issues that they’re having,” Sircy said.

“We’re all in this together, you know it’s public school, it’s for everybody,” Jack Wisman added.

Wisman says a safe learning environment is his number one priority. I asked the Director of Safe and Drug Free Schools how the district is handling Crosby Middle. A school that’s gone from 68 to 145 to 536 cases of harassment or bullying in the last three years.

With a child that goes to Crosby Middle I told Wisman I wasn’t okay with those numbers. “No I wouldn’t be either, and I’m sure Crosby isn’t and the other parents at Crosby are probably like you know what can we do to get ahead of this,” Wisman said.

We pointed out to Hensley there were also five weapons reported at Crosby in the 2013-2014 school year. “I understand sir, I agree with you, we’re not OK with those numbers,” Hensley said. The district has sent a consultancy team into Crosby and is working with the assistant superintendent to find out why those numbers have spiked and to stop them.

John Marshall is the Jefferson County’s Chief Equity officer at JCPS “The majority of our students are black, brown and foreign born,” said Marshall. He says JCPS now has a majority minority population with 5095 English as a second language students over 65-hundred limited English students. The difficulty in job is to make sure that all students feel safe as they understand it and know it and it doesn’t impede on or interfere with their learning.

Marshall says the District is training teachers to understand racial, cultural and ethnic differences in students. And the State of Kentucky is promoting an anti-bullying campaign named “Lean on Me” encouraging kids to stand up for each other.

In the end, the numbers are the numbers and your child is your child. Are there schools that should improve? – The answer is yes to that, but I can’t sit here and tell you I can publish a report that says school a is safer than school b – and I just won’t do that,” Jon Akers said.

But as parents we can do that, and the homework is already done.

The reading assignment is the Kentucky School Report Card, click here for more information.

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Teaching Children Online Safety ‘As Important as Crossing The Road’, Says Marie Collins Foundation http://www.dare.org/teaching-children-online-safety-as-important-as-crossing-the-road-says-marie-collins-foundation/ http://www.dare.org/teaching-children-online-safety-as-important-as-crossing-the-road-says-marie-collins-foundation/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 01:31:47 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16717 Children must be educated about online dangers from the very beginning, urges head of online child abuse charity – Marie Collins Foundation. (Reuters). From International Business Times. Educating children about being safe online is as fundamentally important as teaching them how tocross the road, says head of online child abuse charity, and parents must be […]

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Children must be educated about online dangers from the very beginning, urges head of online child abuse charity – Marie Collins Foundation. (Reuters).

From International Business Times.

Educating children about being safe online is as fundamentally important as teaching them how tocross the road, says head of online child abuse charity, and parents must be aware of this from birth.

This is the message from Tink Palmer, chief executive officer of the Marie Collins Foundation, which this week announced a joint initiative with BT to radically improve the way police, social services and education sector deal with sexual abuse of children online.

Talking to IBTimes UK, Palmer said teaching children about the dangers of communicating online is “absolutely” the same as road safety and telling a child not to run with scissors. “It should be there from the start because you cannot divide what is online and offline, no child understands that.”

Called Click: Path to Protection, the initiative will see changes in the way the police, social servicesand education deals with online child sex offences and grooming of young people, after research found 95% of frontline employees said they need to be better informed on the matter.

While the police now plan to approach abuse victims with increased care and sensitivity, education also needs an overhaul. Palmer explained that young children need to be better informed about thedangers of communicating online. “With grooming the difficult point is about 11 [years old]. Most of the children I’ve worked with are presented to me when they are about 14, but before then they have been groomed gradually from about 11 onwards.

“For education this means we need to go back two years to when they are about nine, before they go to secondary school, we need to be really ensuring that they understand about it.”

But then Palmer says the education needs to go back further, to new parents who should receive information about staying safe online when they leave hospital after their child is born. “It starts from within the womb,” Palmer urged.

As they grow up, Palmer asks that children be invited to talk with their parents about what they do online in the same way they do about offline activities, and only once the conversations about online and offline lives became equally important will progress be made.

Because of the internet and how easy it makes seeing inappropriate content, Palmer asks parents to understand that their children will grow up differently to those of their generation.

“We have to assume that children [now] will see things that children from my generation would never, ever see. So it’s no good saying ‘well my child probably won’t [see harmful material]’ because your child probably will.

“You need to equip your child so that they don’t feel bad about telling you about [what they see and do online]. And the most important thing in the whole world of child safety is that parents need to have a discourse with their online activity from the start.”

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Anti-bullying campaign empowering Loveland students http://www.dare.org/anti-bullying-campaign-empowering-loveland-students/ http://www.dare.org/anti-bullying-campaign-empowering-loveland-students/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 01:22:36 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16714 Loveland City Schools Human Resources Assistant Superintendent Keith Koehne, left, and Superintendent Chad Hilliker wear their “Be an Upstander” shirts from My Voice, My Choice’s anti-bullying campagin to empower bystanders. (Photo: Heather Higdon). From cincinnati.com. Loveland City Schools’ counseling department is working to make a culture of acceptance and caring in the district. Loveland High School […]

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Loveland City Schools Human Resources Assistant Superintendent Keith Koehne, left, and Superintendent Chad Hilliker wear their “Be an Upstander” shirts from My Voice, My Choice’s anti-bullying campagin to empower bystanders. (Photo: Heather Higdon).

From cincinnati.com.

Loveland City Schools’ counseling department is working to make a culture of acceptance and caring in the district.

Loveland High School Counselor Jamie Gordon and School Nurse Judy Leamy presented about the district’s anti-bully program, My Voice, My Choice at a Loveland School Board meeting.

My Voice, My Choice is meant to supplement the district’s iCare program, which deals with how to treat others in the classroom and how the staff can be role models, Leamy said.

Gordon said this year’s theme for the program is “Be an Upstander.” The program is working to empower bystanders and teaching them to stand up for others.

“My Voice, My Choice is empowering the bystanders to stand up to bullying and making good choices,” Leamy said.

She added the group behind My Voice, My Choice has been wanting to focus on bystanders since the program started four years ago.

“We have worked with the victims, we have worked with the bullies. But, we felt like we could make a huge difference if we empowered the bystander to stand up for anyone who is being a victim of bullying,” Leamy said.

Students who have been “upstanders” have been honored at basketball and football games and teachers in the program have been selecting students who will be featured in a video made by Chief Information Officer Heather Higdon.

Gordon said My Voice, My Choice is working on having a tolerance fair to further education students and the community.

The department has also been expanding Loveland Adult Mentor Program, or LAMP. The district has been working with Loveland Area Chamber of Commerce Director CeeCee Collins to bring in professional adults from the community to mentor students at the high school.

“Right now it exists only at the high school, but I would love to see it go beyond,” Gordon said.

Gordon said the students are pulled out of class for 45 minutes during the school day to have a mentoring session with their mentors.

“The kids need support in many different ways and if we can provide that for them their academic success is going to improve, along with their graduation rate and audience,” Gordon said.

Superintendent Chad Hilliker thanked Gordon and Leamy for finding a way to help Loveland students beyond their academic achievements.

“There is nothing more than our students and making sure that not only do they do well academically, but also doing well socially with each other,” Hilliker said.

 

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Operation: Safe Community through the the Drug Dealer Eviction Program http://www.dare.org/operation-safe-community-through-the-the-drug-dealer-eviction-program/ http://www.dare.org/operation-safe-community-through-the-the-drug-dealer-eviction-program/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 01:11:27 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16709 From wreg.com. Kicking drug dealers out of Memphis neighborhoods is one of the priorities of Operation Safe Community. The Drug Dealer Eviction Program lets residents help police identify drug dealers where they live. Assistant District Attorney Paul Hagerman is the Chief Prosecutor of the D.A.’s Organized Crime Prosecution Team. He takes the lead on cases involving […]

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From wreg.com.

Kicking drug dealers out of Memphis neighborhoods is one of the priorities of Operation Safe Community.

The Drug Dealer Eviction Program lets residents help police identify drug dealers where they live.

Assistant District Attorney Paul Hagerman is the Chief Prosecutor of the D.A.’s Organized Crime Prosecution Team.

He takes the lead on cases involving the Drug Dealer Eviction Program.

The Drug Dealer Eviction Program offers citizens a safe way to help law enforcement identify drug dealers in their neighborhoods.

This is a collaborative effort between CrimeStoppers, Memphis Police, the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office and Memphis Area Neighborhood Watch, as well as local realtors and landlords.

To anonymously report a suspected drug dealer in your neighborhood, call 528-CASH.

Operation Safe Community

  • For more information:
  • (901) 527-2600

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Piedmont students graduate from D.A.R.E. http://www.dare.org/piedmont-students-graduate-from-d-a-r-e/ http://www.dare.org/piedmont-students-graduate-from-d-a-r-e/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 00:55:45 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16700 From Rapid City Journal. The Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) culmination ceremony for the fifth grade students at Piedmont Valley Elementary School was held last week with 66 students participating. The 10-week class was taught by Meade County Deputy Sheriff David Moore, who has been a D.A.R.E. instructor since for 13 years. The Meade County […]

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From Rapid City Journal.

The Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) culmination ceremony for the fifth grade students at Piedmont Valley Elementary School was held last week with 66 students participating.

The 10-week class was taught by Meade County Deputy Sheriff David Moore, who has been a D.A.R.E. instructor since for 13 years. The Meade County Sheriff’s office has offered D.A.R.E. lessons in Meade School District since 1988.

Moore and the fifth grade teachers selected the following three personal commitment essays to be read at the culmination ceremony.

Emmalyn BrantDARE Report

By Emmalyn Brant

It has been a privilege to be in D.A.R.E. Why do I like D.A.R.E.? I like D.A.R.E. because I learned different facts about tobacco use and what happens to people when they do drugs.

D.A.R.E. isn’t just about what happens to people when they use tobacco. That’s what I thought at first. I also learned how to deal with stress, use communication correctly, and how to deal with bullying.

A good way to deal with stress is counting to ten. Great ways to communicate with someone when they are teasing is to say please stop and try not to yell or scream at them. One way to deal with bullying is to tell a teacher or an adult. I also learned what a health effect is. Some people think that it is just what happens to your health in general. A health effect is really a result of using a drug.

In D.A.R.E. I also learned something called the D.A.R.E. Decision Making Model. You are probably wondering what that is. D – is to define the problem or challenge that you are dealing with. A – is to assess the choices you have. R – is to respond to make the decision you think is best. E – is to evaluate. Did you make a good decision? What do those letters spell? D.A.R.E. I plan to use the D.A.R.E. Decision Making Model when I have a difficult decision to make.

In D.A.R.E. I also learned how to make safe and responsible choices. Some of the choices I have already made are not to do drugs, use tobacco, or smoke, I learned how to make little choices, like not to cheat on a test or skipping school or even smaller choices like taking care of my siblings. I know these choices will help me later in my life.

Braelyn JuveMy D.A.R.E. Report

By Braelyn Juve

Did you know more than 400,000 Americans die from tobacco-related deaths each year? I think D.A.R.E. was really fun most of the time. I think everybody should try D.A.R.E.

I learned a great deal of things in D.A.R.E. One thing we learned about was pressure and stress, like if your friends try to pressure you into doing something you might get stressed out. We also learned about bullying in one lesson. One time we did an activity where we were given a situation and then we went to certain places for how the situation made us feel. Once my friends and I did a little play to show people not to use and get things like drugs from strangers. We were all super heroes except for Christopher who was a villain trying to sell us drugs.

So we learned a thing called D.A.R.E. decision making model. I have not yet used it, but I might use it in a decision like going to a friend’s house or on a family vacation,. The D.A.R.E. decision making model is where you define, assess, respond and evaluate the problem.

I might choose to use what I have learned in D.A.R.E. in dealing with stress. If your friends saw you doing something you didn’t want them to see you doing, first of all tell them why you are doing it in a kind and polite way, If they start laughing at you, just stay calm and ask then to stop. We also learned about ways to deal with bullying, If you are getting bullied or if a friend is getting bullied then what you can do is tell an adult or you can also do something about it yourself and tell the bully to stop hurting you or whoever is getting bullied.

Carlie SchlosserD.A.R.E Report

By Carlie Schlosser

I really liked D.A.R.E. because it was a lot of fun. One thing I liked was the D.A.R.E. song. I also liked Retro Bill because he was so funny, and taught us about safety too. I really enjoyed the D.A.R.E. song because it was catchy, and fun to sing and dance, too.

I learned a lot; where do I start. I was very interested in learning about drugs. My favorite part was learning how drugs get to your brain cells. I’m so glad I got to learn about it. I had no idea drugs could do that.

I enjoyed learning about the five W’s of reporting bullying. I didn’t even know it existed. Now that I know what it is, I think it is amazing. It is going to help me a lot. I will try hard to stop bullying.

I also learned about the signs of stress. That has helped me a lot. My family deals with a lot of stress. Now I know when they are stressed out. I hope to help them get through their stress and be more understanding.

I also really liked learning about safe and responsible choices. It was good to learn what will happen if you make certain choices. It will help me make better informed decisions and that is pretty cool.

The D.A.R.E. decision making model means the following. The D means define the problem. A stands for assess. R means respond. And last, but not least, E means evaluate. It is pretty cool. I will use this model for a lot of things.

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