D.A.R.E. America http://www.dare.org Empowering Children to Lead Safe and Healthy Lives Fri, 29 Aug 2014 00:55:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 Ron Brogan’s Ice Bucket Challenge, Assisted by Adorable Little Charmers http://www.dare.org/ron-brogans-ice-bucket-challenge-assisted-adorable-little-charmers/ http://www.dare.org/ron-brogans-ice-bucket-challenge-assisted-adorable-little-charmers/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 23:44:26 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15361 Ronald Brogan, D.A.R.E. America Regional Director responsible for Region #1, in his Ice Bucket Challenge. Ron’s assistants are the cutest and most adorable ever seen on any ALS challenge video!

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Ronald Brogan, D.A.R.E. America Regional Director responsible for Region #1, in his Ice Bucket Challenge.

Ron’s assistants are the cutest and most adorable ever seen on any ALS challenge video!

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ALS Challenge: John Lindsay and Three Buckets of Ice http://www.dare.org/als-challenge-john-lindsay/ http://www.dare.org/als-challenge-john-lindsay/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 06:50:44 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15335 John Lindsay, D.A.R.E. America Regional Director responsible for Region #2, in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. Lindsay challenged D.A.R.E. President of Development Tom Hazelton, Ron Carter, and Nick Rodriguez. He wrote, “Tom/Ron/Nick, you have been challenged.  The 24 hour clock starts now.”

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John Lindsay, D.A.R.E. America Regional Director responsible for Region #2, in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.

Lindsay challenged D.A.R.E. President of Development Tom Hazelton, Ron Carter, and Nick Rodriguez. He wrote, “Tom/Ron/Nick, you have been challenged.  The 24 hour clock starts now.”

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D.A.R.E. Camp Inspires Youth To Be Heroes http://www.dare.org/d-r-e-camp-inspires-youth-heroes/ http://www.dare.org/d-r-e-camp-inspires-youth-heroes/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 01:10:23 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15319 Campers, counselors and staff took part in Henderson County Sheriff’s Office D.A.R.E. Camp last week at Camp Pinewood. PATRICK SULLIVAN/TIMES-NEWS. From BlueRidgeNow.com. Campers, counselors and staff took part in Henderson County Sheriff’s Office D.A.R.E. Camp last week at Camp Pinewood. The Henderson County Sheriff’s Office has been providing the county’s rising sixth-graders with a camp […]

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Campers, counselors and staff took part in Henderson County Sheriff’s Office D.A.R.E. Camp last week at Camp Pinewood.
PATRICK SULLIVAN/TIMES-NEWS.

From BlueRidgeNow.com.

Campers, counselors and staff took part in Henderson County Sheriff’s Office D.A.R.E. Camp last week at Camp Pinewood. The Henderson County Sheriff’s Office has been providing the county’s rising sixth-graders with a camp experience for the past 20 years.

This year, 240 campers participated in activities such as swimming, canoeing, crafts, skits, team-building efforts, fishing, archery and the “blob,” as well as hearing individuals speak about the devastating consequences of drug use. Middle school, high school and college students who have committed to a drug-free lifestyle acted as counselors and role models as they volunteered their time for the week.

Retired Maj. Gloria Nock has seen the impact D.A.R.E. camp has on its participants’ lives. Campers, as well as counselors, learn teamwork, confidence and decision-making skills, Nock said.

Every day, campers are encouraged to do three things: make new friends, learn something new or work on a skill and do something for others.

The D.A.R.E. Camp theme this year was “Twenty Years of Heroes.” More than 3,000 campers and close to 1,000 counselors have taken part in camp over its 20-year history.

Campers were reminded that everyone can be a hero by looking for ways to serve others.

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A Parent’s Guide to Internet Safety http://www.dare.org/parents-guide-internet-safety/ http://www.dare.org/parents-guide-internet-safety/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 00:57:35 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15316 From www.fbi.gov. Dear Parent: Our children are our nation’s most valuable asset. They represent the bright future of our country and hold our hopes for a better nation. Our children are also the most vulnerable members of society. Protecting our children against the fear of crime and from becoming victims of crime must be a […]

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From www.fbi.gov.

Dear Parent:

Our children are our nation’s most valuable asset. They represent the bright future of our country and hold our hopes for a better nation. Our children are also the most vulnerable members of society. Protecting our children against the fear of crime and from becoming victims of crime must be a national priority.

Unfortunately the same advances in computer and telecommunication technology that allow our children to reach out to new sources of knowledge and cultural experiences are also leaving them vulnerable to exploitation and harm by computer-sex offenders.

I hope that this pamphlet helps you to begin to understand the complexities of online child exploitation. For further information, please contact your local FBI office or the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children at 1-800-843-5678.

Introduction

While on-line computer exploration opens a world of possibilities for children, expanding their horizons and exposing them to different cultures and ways of life, they can be exposed to dangers as they hit the road exploring the information highway. There are individuals who attempt to sexually exploit children through the use of on-line services and the Internet. Some of these individuals gradually seduce their targets through the use of attention, affection, kindness, and even gifts. These individuals are often willing to devote considerable amounts of time, money, and energy in this process. They listen to and empathize with the problems of children. They will be aware of the latest music, hobbies, and interests of children. These individuals attempt to gradually lower children’s inhibitions by slowly introducing sexual context and content into their conversations.

There are other individuals, however, who immediately engage in sexually explicit conversation with children. Some offenders primarily collect and trade child-pornographic images, while others seek face-to-face meetings with children via on-line contacts. It is important for parents to understand that children can be indirectly victimized through conversation, i.e. “chat,” as well as the transfer of sexually explicit information and material. Computer-sex offenders may also be evaluating children they come in contact with on-line for future face-to-face contact and direct victimization. Parents and children should remember that a computer-sex offender can be any age or sex the person does not have to fit the caricature of a dirty, unkempt, older man wearing a raincoat to be someone who could harm a child.

Children, especially adolescents, are sometimes interested in and curious about sexuality and sexually explicit material. They may be moving away from the total control of parents and seeking to establish new relationships outside their family. Because they may be curious, children/adolescents sometimes use their on-line access to actively seek out such materials and individuals. Sex offenders targeting children will use and exploit these characteristics and needs. Some adolescent children may also be attracted to and lured by on-line offenders closer to their age who, although not technically child molesters, may be dangerous. Nevertheless, they have been seduced and manipulated by a clever offender and do not fully understand or recognize the potential danger of these contacts.

This guide was prepared from actual investigations involving child victims, as well as investigations where law enforcement officers posed as children. Further information on protecting your child on-line may be found in the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children’s Child Safety on the Information Highway and Teen Safety on the Information Highway pamphlets.

What Are Signs That Your Child Might Be At Risk On-line?

Your child spends large amounts of time on-line, especially at night.

Most children that fall victim to computer-sex offenders spend large amounts of time on-line, particularly in chat rooms. They may go on-line after dinner and on the weekends. They may be latchkey kids whose parents have told them to stay at home after school. They go on-line to chat with friends, make new friends, pass time, and sometimes look for sexually explicit information. While much of the knowledge and experience gained may be valuable, parents should consider monitoring the amount of time spent on-line.

Children on-line are at the greatest risk during the evening hours. While offenders are on-line around the clock, most work during the day and spend their evenings on-line trying to locate and lure children or seeking pornography.

You find pornography on your child’s computer.

Pornography is often used in the sexual victimization of children. Sex offenders often supply their potential victims with pornography as a means of opening sexual discussions and for seduction. Child pornography may be used to show the child victim that sex between children and adults is “normal.” Parents should be conscious of the fact that a child may hide the pornographic files on diskettes from them. This may be especially true if the computer is used by other family members.

Your child receives phone calls from men you don’t know or is making calls, sometimes long distance, to numbers you don’t recognize.

Hand with telephone (drawing)While talking to a child victim on-line is a thrill for a computer-sex offender, it can be very cumbersome. Most want to talk to the children on the telephone. They often engage in “phone sex” with the children and often seek to set up an actual meeting for real sex.

While a child may be hesitant to give out his/her home phone number, the computer-sex offenders will give out theirs. With Caller ID, they can readily find out the child’s phone number. Some computer-sex offenders have even obtained toll-free 800 numbers, so that their potential victims can call them without their parents finding out. Others will tell the child to call collect. Both of these methods result in the computer-sex offender being able to find out the child’s phone number.

Your child receives mail, gifts, or packages from someone you don’t know.

As part of the seduction process, it is common for offenders to send letters, photographs, and all manner of gifts to their potential victims. Computer-sex offenders have even sent plane tickets in order for the child to travel across the country to meet them.

Your child turns the computer monitor off or quickly changes the screen on the monitor when you come into the room.

A child looking at pornographic images or having sexually explicit conversations does not want you to see it on the screen.

Your child becomes withdrawn from the family.

Computer-sex offenders will work very hard at driving a wedge between a child and their family or at exploiting their relationship. They will accentuate any minor problems at home that the child might have. Children may also become withdrawn after sexual victimization.

Your child is using an on-line account belonging to someone else.

Even if you don’t subscribe to an on-line service or Internet service, your child may meet an offender while on-line at a friend’s house or the library. Most computers come preloaded with on-line and/or Internet software. Computer-sex offenders will sometimes provide potential victims with a computer account for communications with them.

What Should You Do If You Suspect Your Child Is Communicating With A Sexual Predator Online?

  • Consider talking openly with your child about your suspicions. Tell them about the dangers of computer-sex offenders.
  • Review what is on your child’s computer. If you don’t know how, ask a friend, coworker, relative, or other knowledgeable person. Pornography or any kind of sexual communication can be a warning sign.
  • Use the Caller ID service to determine who is calling your child. Most telephone companies that offer Caller ID also offer a service that allows you to block your number from appearing on someone else’s Caller ID. Telephone companies also offer an additional service feature that rejects incoming calls that you block. This rejection feature prevents computer-sex offenders or anyone else from calling your home anonymously.
  • Devices can be purchased that show telephone numbers that have been dialed from your home phone. Additionally, the last number called from your home phone can be retrieved provided that the telephone is equipped with a redial feature. You will also need a telephone pager to complete this retrieval.
  • This is done using a numeric-display pager and another phone that is on the same line as the first phone with the redial feature. Using the two phones and the pager, a call is placed from the second phone to the pager. When the paging terminal beeps for you to enter a telephone number, you press the redial button on the first (or suspect) phone. The last number called from that phone will then be displayed on the pager.
  • Monitor your child’s access to all types of live electronic communications (i.e., chat rooms, instant messages, Internet Relay Chat, etc.), and monitor your child’s e-mail. Computer-sex offenders almost always meet potential victims via chat rooms. After meeting a child on-line, they will continue to communicate electronically often via e-mail.

Should any of the following situations arise in your household, via the Internet or on-line service, you should immediately contact your local or state law enforcement agency, the FBI, and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children:

1. Your child or anyone in the household has received child pornography;
2. Your child has been sexually solicited by someone who knows that your child is under 18 years of age;
3. Your child has received sexually explicit images from someone that knows your child is under the age of 18.

If one of these scenarios occurs, keep the computer turned off in order to preserve any evidence for future law enforcement use. Unless directed to do so by the law enforcement agency, you should not attempt to copy any of the images and/or text found on the computer.

What Can You Do To Minimize The Chances Of An On-line Exploiter Victimizing Your Child?

  • Communicate, and talk to your child about sexual victimization and potential on-line danger.
  • Spend time with your children on-line. Have them teach you about their favorite on-line destinations.
  • Keep the computer in a common room in the house, not in your child’s bedroom. It is much more difficult for a computer-sex offender to communicate with a child when the computer screen is visible to a parent or another member of the household.
  • Utilize parental controls provided by your service provider and/or blocking software. While electronic chat can be a great place for children to make new friends and discuss various topics of interest, it is also prowled by computer-sex offenders. Use of chat rooms, in particular, should be heavily monitored. While parents should utilize these mechanisms, they should not totally rely on them.
  • Always maintain access to your child’s on-line account and randomly check his/her e-mail. Be aware that your child could be contacted through the U.S. Mail. Be up front with your child about your access and reasons why.
  • Teach your child the responsible use of the resources on-line. There is much more to the on-line experience than chat rooms.
  • Find out what computer safeguards are utilized by your child’s school, the public library, and at the homes of your child’s friends. These are all places, outside your normal supervision, where your child could encounter an on-line predator.
  • Understand, even if your child was a willing participant in any form of sexual exploitation, that he/she is not at fault and is the victim. The offender always bears the complete responsibility for his or her actions.
  • Instruct your children:
    • to never arrange a face-to-face meeting with someone they met on- line;
    • to never upload (post) pictures of themselves onto the Internet or on-line service to people they do not personally know;
    • to never give out identifying information such as their name, home address, school name, or telephone number;
    • to never download pictures from an unknown source, as there is a good chance there could be sexually explicit images;
    • to never respond to messages or bulletin board postings that are suggestive, obscene, belligerent, or harassing;
    • that whatever they are told on-line may or may not be true.

Frequently Asked Questions:

My child has received an e-mail advertising for a pornographic website, what should I do?

Generally, advertising for an adult, pornographic website that is sent to an e-mail address does not violate federal law or the current laws of most states. In some states it may be a violation of law if the sender knows the recipient is under the age of 18. Such advertising can be reported to your service provider and, if known, the service provider of the originator. It can also be reported to your state and federal legislators, so they can be made aware of the extent of the problem.

Is any service safer than the others?

Sex offenders have contacted children via most of the major on-line services and the Internet. The most important factors in keeping your child safe on-line are the utilization of appropriate blocking software and/or parental controls, along with open, honest discussions with your child, monitoring his/her on-line activity, and following the tips in this pamphlet.

Should I just forbid my child from going on-line?

There are dangers in every part of our society. By educating your children to these dangers and taking appropriate steps to protect them, they can benefit from the wealth of information now available on-line.

Helpful Definitions:

Internet – An immense, global network that connects computers via telephone lines and/or fiber networks to storehouses of electronic information. With only a computer, a modem, a telephone line and a service provider, people from all over the world can communicate and share information with little more than a few keystrokes.

Bulletin Board Systems (BBSs) – Electronic networks of computers that are connected by a central computer setup and operated by a system administrator or operator and are distinguishable from the Internet by their “dial-up” accessibility. BBS users link their individual computers to the central BBS computer by a modem which allows them to post messages, read messages left by others, trade information, or hold direct conversations. Access to a BBS can, and often is, privileged and limited to those users who have access privileges granted by the systems operator.

Commercial On-line Service (COS) – Examples of COSs are America Online, Prodigy, CompuServe and Microsoft Network, which provide access to their service for a fee. COSs generally offer limited access to the Internet as part of their total service package.

Internet Service Provider (ISP) – Examples of ISPs are Erols, Concentric and Netcom. These services offer direct, full access to the Internet at a flat, monthly rate and often provide electronic-mail service for their customers. ISPs often provide space on their servers for their customers to maintain World Wide Web (WWW) sites. Not all ISPs are commercial enterprises. Educational, governmental and nonprofit organizations also provide Internet access to their members.

Public Chat Rooms – Created, maintained, listed and monitored by the COS and other public domain systems such as Internet Relay Chat. A number of customers can be in the public chat rooms at any given time, which are monitored for illegal activity and even appropriate language by systems operators (SYSOP). Some public chat rooms are monitored more frequently than others, depending on the COS and the type of chat room. Violators can be reported to the administrators of the system (at America On-line they are referred to as terms of service [TOS]) which can revoke user privileges. The public chat rooms usually cover a broad range of topics such as entertainment, sports, game rooms, children only, etc.

Electronic Mail (E-Mail) – A function of BBSs, COSs and ISPs which provides for the transmission of messages and files between computers over a communications network similar to mailing a letter via the postal service. E-mail is stored on a server, where it will remain until the addressee retrieves it. Anonymity can be maintained by the sender by predetermining what the receiver will see as the “from” address. Another way to conceal one’s identity is to use an “anonymous remailer,” which is a service that allows the user to send an e-mail message repackaged under the remailer’s own header, stripping off the originator’s name completely.

Chat – Real-time text conversation between users in a chat room with no expectation of privacy. All chat conversation is accessible by all individuals in the chat room while the conversation is taking place.

Instant Messages – Private, real-time text conversation between two users in a chat room.

Internet Relay Chat (IRC) – Real-time text conversation similar to public and/or private chat rooms on COS.

Usenet (Newsgroups) – Like a giant, cork bulletin board where users post messages and information. Each posting is like an open letter and is capable of having attachments, such as graphic image files (GIFs). Anyone accessing the newsgroup can read the postings, take copies of posted items, or post responses. Each newsgroup can hold thousands of postings. Currently, there are over 29,000 public newsgroups and that number is growing daily. Newsgroups are both public and/or private. There is no listing of private newsgroups. A user of private newsgroups has to be invited into the newsgroup and be provided with the newsgroup’s address.

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AG Cooper Offers Tips for Back to School Safety http://www.dare.org/ag-cooper-offers-tips-back-school-safety/ http://www.dare.org/ag-cooper-offers-tips-back-school-safety/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 00:32:53 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15262 From www.jdnews.com. Charlotte: Attorney General Roy Cooper today offered tips to help parents and teachers get children back to school safely and ready to learn as the traditional school year begins across North Carolina. Cooper today visited Westerly Hills Academy in Charlotte to talk to students, teachers and administrators about school safety on the first […]

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From www.jdnews.com.

Charlotte: Attorney General Roy Cooper today offered tips to help parents and teachers get children back to school safely and ready to learn as the traditional school year begins across North Carolina.

Cooper today visited Westerly Hills Academy in Charlotte to talk to students, teachers and administrators about school safety on the first day of the traditional school year for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public Schools and many other school systems.

“Students, schools, families, law enforcement and communities working together must all work together to ensure a safe and successful school year,” Cooper said. “A few simple steps can give parents and teachers some peace of mind so they can focus on helping kids learn.”

Cooper’s office offers the following safety tips:

  • Ask about the school’s current safety plan. The plan should include how the school would work with local law enforcement and other first responders in the event of an emergency such as a school shooting. Ask if teachers have been trained and what you should do as a parent if a crisis occurs at school.
  • Ask how employees are screened. Make sure your child’s school, day care and after school activities screen their employees including background checks. Visit and get to know the people who spend time with your children.
  • Consider carefully the questions a school asks about student privacy. For example, whether you’re OK with having a photo of your child on the school website or taken by a news organization. If the school doesn’t ask, inquire about its policy.
  • Update your list of emergency contacts. Give a current copy to your child’s school and any after-school programs. Make sure that everyone on the list knows key information, such as how to get to your child’s school, your pediatrician’s name and number, alarm codes for your house, etc.
  • Ask the school to notify you if your child doesn’t arrive at school. Let the school know who is authorized to pick up your child. Make sure your children know who would pick them up in case of an emergency or if you aren’t able to.
  • Make sure young children know their full name, parent’s name, address and phone number. You may also want to consider getting an ID card from the NC Division of Motor Vehicles for your child to carry.
  • Protect your child’s identifying information from strangers. Identity thieves will use information like a child’s Social Security Number to open credit lines without parents’ knowledge. Only give identifying information when necessary, and when you do, ask how it will be used and protected.
  • Talk to your kids about abuse of alcohol, prescription drugs and street drugs. Tell your kids how these substances can affect them and discuss what to do if they feel pressured to use drugs or alcohol. For older kids, discuss how to get out of dangerous situations they may face, for example if their ride home drinks or takes drugs. Parents and teachers are on the front lines for spotting addiction, so know the warning signs, such as students who withdraw from relationships, lose interest in school and extracurriculars, and/or have unexplained changes in mood.
  • Teach your kids about how to stay safe from strangers, even on the Internet. Set ground rules for Internet use, agree on websites that are OK to visit and explain what is and is not appropriate to do or view online. Easy to use tools that can help, including a video and resource guide, are available free from Cooper’s office at www.ncdoj.gov.
  • Think carefully about social media use. Consider the age and maturity of your children before deciding to let them use social networking sites. If you decide to allow it, read the site’s safety tips, utilize its privacy settings, and provide extra supervision. Discuss how problems can arise if people share inappropriate messages and embarrassing photos or respond to scams. If younger children use in-school social networking, make sure they know what terms and information are appropriate or not appropriate to share online with classmates and teachers.
  • Talk to your kids about mobile phone use. Let kids know that safety rules still apply if they use their phones to go online. Teens also need to know about the dangers of texting or talking on the phone while driving. According to the National Safety Council, drivers who use their cell phones are four times more likely to crash.
  • Talk to school staff about Internet safety and privacy, too. Computers can be a wonderful learning tool, and many children now have access to the Internet in classrooms and school libraries. Ask your child’s school how they protect their students when they go online.
  • Encourage your children to talk to you about anything that makes them feel scared, threatened, or uncomfortable. Remind your kids not to condone or participate in bullying behavior. Teach your kids which trustworthy adults (such as grandparents, teachers, school resource officers, a neighbor you know and trust) they can also turn to when they need help.

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NASCAR’s Kenseth Behind Anti-Bullying Kids’ Book http://www.dare.org/nascars-kenseth-behind-anti-bullying-kids-book/ http://www.dare.org/nascars-kenseth-behind-anti-bullying-kids-book/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 00:22:52 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15311 From ABC News. Photo by Rick R. Duncan. Matt Kenseth, championship-winning race car driver, can now add a children’s book to his resume. Kenseth and his wife, Katie, released “Race Against Bullying” on Tuesday in conjunction with National Youth Literacy Day. The book written by Gina Gold chronicles the first day of fourth grade for […]

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From ABC News.

Photo by Rick R. Duncan.

Matt Kenseth, championship-winning race car driver, can now add a children’s book to his resume.

Kenseth and his wife, Katie, released “Race Against Bullying” on Tuesday in conjunction with National Youth Literacy Day. The book written by Gina Gold chronicles the first day of fourth grade for a boy named Matt, whose love of racing is mocked by another boy. Matt gets support from family and friends, including a pretty blonde named Katie, and talks to a school counselor as well as his parents.

The Kenseths have three daughters under the age of 5 and picked their first topic, bullying, when the eldest came home from school upset that a friend had been picking on her.

“Both Katie and I believe that openly talking about these issues is the best way to prepare them,” Kenseth said. “This book is designed to help families discuss the effects of bullying with their kids. We believe it’s important our kids not only know how to deal with a bully, but also understand that it’s not OK to act like one.”

According to www.stopbullying.gov, more than 70 percent of students say they have seen bullying in their schools and less than 30 percent of students who are bullied notify an adult. The Kenseths had all three daughters with them on Tuesday as they unveiled the book at Joe Gibbs Racing, and Katie Kenseth read it to a group of schoolchildren who were also treated to a tour of the race shop.

Kenseth, who is sponsored by Dollar General, is an ambassador for Dollar General’s Literacy Foundation. In honor of the book launch, his longtime personal sponsor Citizen Watch made a $25,000 donation on Kenseth’s behalf to the foundation.

Katie Kenseth said the second installment in the series will likely focus on nutrition. She said working through the “Race Against Bullying” was a process for both her and the 2003 NASCAR champion and two-time Daytona 500 champion. They’d receive the story and reply with suggestions on what they thought it was missing.

Many times they relied on real-life experiences from their own household — for example, oldest daughter Kaylin responds best in situations that she can break into steps.

“We tried to make it a three-step process in handling the bullying, but keep it simple enough for Kaylin’s age group to grasp and take in,” Katie Kenseth said. “She likes a series of things, she likes to know, ‘We do this because of this, and this and this.’ She likes everything in order, and we thought that format worked.”

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Tempe Police Launch ‘Safe and Sober’ Campaign To Keep Community Safe http://www.dare.org/tempe-police-launch-safe-sober-campaign-keep-community-safe/ http://www.dare.org/tempe-police-launch-safe-sober-campaign-keep-community-safe/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 00:10:52 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15308 From East Valley Tribune. Tempe Police, with assistance from the Governor’s Office of Highway Safety (GOHS) and 17 Valley police agencies, launched the “Safe and Sober” Campaign Thursday, August 21. Lieutenant Michael Pooley said a total of 392 arrests took place within the first three days of the campaign, including 146 DUI’s and 112 arrests […]

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From East Valley Tribune.

Tempe Police, with assistance from the Governor’s Office of Highway Safety (GOHS) and 17 Valley police agencies, launched the “Safe and Sober” Campaign Thursday, August 21.

Lieutenant Michael Pooley said a total of 392 arrests took place within the first three days of the campaign, including 146 DUI’s and 112 arrests for minors in consumption of alcohol.

Pooley says officers are primarily working to combat underage alcohol consumption and other alcohol-related crimes. To accomplish this mission, they are carrying out increased patrols, DUI enforcement, and liquor law inspections for licensed premises.

A GOHS grant is funding the large-scale operation, making it possible for officers to come together and keep children and community members safe.

The campaign will continue through September 6.

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D.A.R.E. Is Not Cool With Weed Decriminalization in L.A. Schools http://www.dare.org/d-r-e-cool-weed-decriminalization-l-schools/ http://www.dare.org/d-r-e-cool-weed-decriminalization-l-schools/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 00:01:41 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15305 Daren the Lion is not down with weed. From LA Weekly. California D.A.R.E. Coordinator Steve Abercrombie was not pleased to learn the news that the Los Angeles Unified School District had decriminalized small amounts of marijuana at its schools. “Wow,” he tells Toke of the Town. “It seems we keep giving in more and more […]

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Daren the Lion is not down with weed.

From LA Weekly.

California D.A.R.E. Coordinator Steve Abercrombie was not pleased to learn the news that the Los Angeles Unified School District had decriminalized small amounts of marijuana at its schools.

“Wow,” he tells Toke of the Town. “It seems we keep giving in more and more to different crimes and criminal activity. When does it stop? When do you finally say that you need to follow the rules?”

The district announced more lenient policies in which school police will no longer report students — or issue them tickets — if they’re involved in petty theft, most fights, or possession of alcohol, tobacco or marijuana.

The rule changes resulted from two years of talks between lawyers, judges, school police and civil rights groups who aimed to end LAUSD’s zero-tolerance policies.

One goal is to reduce the influence of campus police, softening the rules so that kids who typically get into trouble don’t drop out.

At issue, in part, is that black students make up about one-third of school police arrests, yet they make up less than 10 percent of the student population.

This, of course, is not exactly in line with the philosophy of the long-running Drug Abuse Resistance Education program.

Abercrombie says it makes more sense to train school police to stop targeting black students than it does to decriminalize weed in schools.

“If it’s against the law, it’s against the law,” he says.

Despite this change, Los Angeles schools are not the most permissive when it comes to this issue. Abercrombie points to Berkeley schools, where most students found with pot are sent to counseling, rather than to the police.

Berkeley Unified School District’s Mark Coplan notes that administrators there are concerned about teen marijuana use. But, he adds, Berkeley students have the lowest tobacco use rate in California; apparently parents there condemn cigarettes but look the other way on cannabis.

“I’m surprised they don’t hand [cannabis] out when they hand out their workbooks,” says Abercrombie, exasperated. “They’re so out in space, it’s unbelievable.”

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Car Show Brings In Cash For Elmwood Park Police Program http://www.dare.org/car-show-brings-cash-elmwood-park-police-program/ http://www.dare.org/car-show-brings-cash-elmwood-park-police-program/#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 23:44:23 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15301 Angelica and Arthur Bosko with their daughter Ewelina look at a 1988 Excalibur at the Elmwood Park D.A.R.E. Car Show and Farmers Market in Central Park on Aug. 23, 2014. | George Edwardson/For Sun-Times Media. (Click image for full view) From elmwoodpark.suntimes.com. Plenty of metal and rubber lined Fullerton Avenue for the Elmwood Park Police […]

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Angelica and Arthur Bosko with their daughter Ewelina look at a 1988 Excalibur at the Elmwood Park D.A.R.E. Car Show and Farmers Market in Central Park on Aug. 23, 2014. | George Edwardson/For Sun-Times Media. (Click image for full view)

From elmwoodpark.suntimes.com.

Plenty of metal and rubber lined Fullerton Avenue for the Elmwood Park Police Department’s D.A.R.E. Car Show, raising money to help the anti-drug program.

Central Park, at 74th and Fullerton avenues, hosted the show Sunday, Aug. 24. Elmwood Park Police Chief Frank Fagiano said there were about 100 cars around the park.

The police department uses the event to raise money for their D.A.R.E. Program in local elementary schools through a number of raffles at the event.

“We raffled off a 55-inch TV, a 32-inch TV, a Blu-Ray system and gift certificates,” he said.

Elmwood Park Deputy Police Chief Andrew Hock, one of the organizers of the show, said when all the bills were paid they had raised about $1,500.

“It was a success, definitely,” he said.

The money raised will go to purchase D.A.R.E. (Drug Awareness Resistance Education) items like pens, pencils and coloring books. These items will be used by the department’s D.A.R.E. officer, who will use the items throughout the village’s elementary schools to educate students about the ills of drug use.

Fagiano said he was pleased with how the event turned out. This is the third year the police department has organized the car show.

He said the good weather played a big part in the event’s success. The event coincided with the village’s Farmer’s Market

“These guys have very expensive cars, and if they think it’s going to rain, they aren’t going to come out,” he said.

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North Woods Elementary School Graduate Wins 2014 Wisconsin DARE Essay Contest http://www.dare.org/north-woods-elementary-school-graduate-wins-2014-wisconsin-dare-essay-contest/ http://www.dare.org/north-woods-elementary-school-graduate-wins-2014-wisconsin-dare-essay-contest/#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 23:19:01 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15292 From WXOW.com. The La Crosse Police Department held an award ceremony Tuesday morning for North Woods Elementary School Graduate Anika Nystrom. Nystrom was one of the 2014 Wisconsin D.A.R.E. Essay Contest Winners. Nystrom’s essay was picked from hundreds from the local area, and then beat out over 70 other essays at the Wisconsin State D.A.R.E. […]

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From WXOW.com.

The La Crosse Police Department held an award ceremony Tuesday morning for North Woods Elementary School Graduate Anika Nystrom. Nystrom was one of the 2014 Wisconsin D.A.R.E. Essay Contest Winners. Nystrom’s essay was picked from hundreds from the local area, and then beat out over 70 other essays at the Wisconsin State D.A.R.E. Conference.

Nystrom wrote about good decision making, responsible choices, and the recent drug overdose death of Philip Seymour Hoffman. Officer Kurt Weaver said he chose Nystrom’s essay as a winner because it was a great example of a student demonstrating what they had learned in DARE and being able to apply that knowledge to real life.

WXOW News 19 La Crosse, WI – News, Weather and Sports |

The La Crosse Police Department awarded Nystrom a medal, pin, water bottle, t-shirt, and other DARE items. Nystrom’s family and her teacher at North Woods Elementary attended the ceremony. Nystrom is starting sixth grade at Logan Middle School this fall.

LA CROSSE STUDENT WINS WI DARE ESSAY CONTEST

From La Crosse PD Newsroom.

The La Crosse Police Department is pleased to announce that Anika Nystrom, a 2014 DARE graduate from North Woods Elementary School in La Crosse, wrote one of the top DARE essays in the entire state of Wisconsin! Anika will receive her awards from the Wisconsin DARE Officers Association tomorrow, August 26th, at a special award ceremony at the Police Department.

As part of graduation, all students are required to submit an essay detailing their experiences and what they’ve learned as a result of their DARE education. La Crosse Police Department DARE Officer Kurt Weaver submitted Anika’s essay to the 2014 Wisconsin DARE Essay Contest. Over 70 entries were reviewed by the Board of Directors at the Wisconsin State DARE Conference. Anika’s essay was chosen as a shining example of, “content and personal application of the things learned in DARE.” Her essay has been featured on the Wisconsin DARE website.

My DARE Report by Anika Nystrom

Do you ever get annoyed by your parents always telling you to make the right choice? I know I sometimes do, but after taking DARE lessons, I know why. Making responsible choices shows respect and keeps people safe.

Often times when you make responsible choices, you show respect for yourself and for others. Sometimes, you even show that you love them. Every time you make a responsible decision, you show that you are more trustworthy. I know people like other people who are trustworthy because they feel comfortable telling them things that, maybe, they wouldn’t want to tell other people. I know that I, being an eleven year old girl, like trustworthy people because I feel like my secrets are safe with them and they won’t tell a soul.

Another great thing about making responsible decisions is that it can save your life. For instance, if a strange man asked you if you wanted to do drugs with him, the responsible thing would be to say “no” and walk away. But, if you said yes or gave in to peer pressure, you could get addicted, overdose, and die. This situation actually happens a lot. People think it’s going to be fun and sometimes it is for a while but then pretty soon they feel like they can’t live without it and want more and more and sometimes they have too much.

Recently, an actor named Philip Seymour Hoffman passed away from a drug overdose. Not only did he leave behind all of his fans, he also left behind his three young children and his partner. All of that was caused because he made a very bad choice. That is why making responsible choices is really important. Just think about someone you love dying because they made a bad decision. You would be heartbroken. Now, Imagine you were the one that died. Wouldn’t you feel terrible knowing that you made all these people feel that way?

Making responsible choices is a very important thing. Not only do you show respect and care but you can also save lives, maybe even your own life and isn’t that a great gift to give to yourself and the people you love?

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