D.A.R.E. America http://www.dare.org Empowering Children to Lead Safe and Healthy Lives Thu, 27 Nov 2014 02:12:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 How safe is your child’s school? http://www.dare.org/how-safe-is-your-childs-school/ http://www.dare.org/how-safe-is-your-childs-school/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 01:39:29 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16720 From whas11.com. LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) – On the surface this is a story about numbers. 22 assaults in Oldham County Schools, 452 drug offenses in Bullitt County, and 67 weapons at Jefferson County Public Schools. When you dig a little deeper, it’s a story about kids and it could be your kid. “Those numbers aren’t good,” […]

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From whas11.com.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) – On the surface this is a story about numbers. 22 assaults in Oldham County Schools, 452 drug offenses in Bullitt County, and 67 weapons at Jefferson County Public Schools. When you dig a little deeper, it’s a story about kids and it could be your kid.

“Those numbers aren’t good,” JCPS Director of Safe and Drug Free Schools Jackie Wisman said when we asked him about 2013-2014 harassment charges at a couple of Jefferson County Public Middle Schools.

“From weapons to drugs to bullying and assault we’re going to show you how to find out exactly what’s going on in your child’s school. Quite often educators would give the good news, but they wouldn’t give the full news,” Commissioner Terry Holliday from The Kentucky Department of Education said. Holiday says today the whole story is available good or bad.

Detailed information about every public school and district in the Bluegrass State is available on the Kentucky School Report Card. When asked whether some schools were safer than others John Akers from the Kentucky Center for School Safety said “Thats a very difficult question to answer.”

Akers heads up the Kentucky Center for School Safety. He says situations like the Fern Creek High school shooting in September complicate the question of school safety. They were troubling images, no question for parents. But when the I-Team looked through records at Fern Creek we discovered that was the only weapon reported there in 3 years.

“When it occurred the Fern Creek faculty and leadership were well prepared for it, they responded immediately,” JCPS Chief Academic Officer Dewey Hensley said. “Second I want parents to know we’re on this,” Hensley added.

Hensley says JCPS is a School system that reported a reduction in suspensions on the last report card.

There are concerns – like at Iroquois High School where with just 982 students 8 weapons were found on school grounds last year. Another, Thomas Jefferson Middle where based on complaints students had nearly a 45 percent chance of being bullied in the 2013-2014 school year.

Lead Counselor Michelle Sircy says some schools are doing a better job reporting. And that doesn’t necessarily make it a less safe school. “That’s what we’re telling them to do, we want them to report. We want to be involved so we can help solve some of those issues that they’re having,” Sircy said.

“We’re all in this together, you know it’s public school, it’s for everybody,” Jack Wisman added.

Wisman says a safe learning environment is his number one priority. I asked the Director of Safe and Drug Free Schools how the district is handling Crosby Middle. A school that’s gone from 68 to 145 to 536 cases of harassment or bullying in the last three years.

With a child that goes to Crosby Middle I told Wisman I wasn’t okay with those numbers. “No I wouldn’t be either, and I’m sure Crosby isn’t and the other parents at Crosby are probably like you know what can we do to get ahead of this,” Wisman said.

We pointed out to Hensley there were also five weapons reported at Crosby in the 2013-2014 school year. “I understand sir, I agree with you, we’re not OK with those numbers,” Hensley said. The district has sent a consultancy team into Crosby and is working with the assistant superintendent to find out why those numbers have spiked and to stop them.

John Marshall is the Jefferson County’s Chief Equity officer at JCPS “The majority of our students are black, brown and foreign born,” said Marshall. He says JCPS now has a majority minority population with 5095 English as a second language students over 65-hundred limited English students. The difficulty in job is to make sure that all students feel safe as they understand it and know it and it doesn’t impede on or interfere with their learning.

Marshall says the District is training teachers to understand racial, cultural and ethnic differences in students. And the State of Kentucky is promoting an anti-bullying campaign named “Lean on Me” encouraging kids to stand up for each other.

In the end, the numbers are the numbers and your child is your child. Are there schools that should improve? – The answer is yes to that, but I can’t sit here and tell you I can publish a report that says school a is safer than school b – and I just won’t do that,” Jon Akers said.

But as parents we can do that, and the homework is already done.

The reading assignment is the Kentucky School Report Card, click here for more information.

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Teaching Children Online Safety ‘As Important as Crossing The Road’, Says Marie Collins Foundation http://www.dare.org/teaching-children-online-safety-as-important-as-crossing-the-road-says-marie-collins-foundation/ http://www.dare.org/teaching-children-online-safety-as-important-as-crossing-the-road-says-marie-collins-foundation/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 01:31:47 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16717 Children must be educated about online dangers from the very beginning, urges head of online child abuse charity – Marie Collins Foundation. (Reuters). From International Business Times. Educating children about being safe online is as fundamentally important as teaching them how tocross the road, says head of online child abuse charity, and parents must be […]

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Children must be educated about online dangers from the very beginning, urges head of online child abuse charity – Marie Collins Foundation. (Reuters).

From International Business Times.

Educating children about being safe online is as fundamentally important as teaching them how tocross the road, says head of online child abuse charity, and parents must be aware of this from birth.

This is the message from Tink Palmer, chief executive officer of the Marie Collins Foundation, which this week announced a joint initiative with BT to radically improve the way police, social services and education sector deal with sexual abuse of children online.

Talking to IBTimes UK, Palmer said teaching children about the dangers of communicating online is “absolutely” the same as road safety and telling a child not to run with scissors. “It should be there from the start because you cannot divide what is online and offline, no child understands that.”

Called Click: Path to Protection, the initiative will see changes in the way the police, social servicesand education deals with online child sex offences and grooming of young people, after research found 95% of frontline employees said they need to be better informed on the matter.

While the police now plan to approach abuse victims with increased care and sensitivity, education also needs an overhaul. Palmer explained that young children need to be better informed about thedangers of communicating online. “With grooming the difficult point is about 11 [years old]. Most of the children I’ve worked with are presented to me when they are about 14, but before then they have been groomed gradually from about 11 onwards.

“For education this means we need to go back two years to when they are about nine, before they go to secondary school, we need to be really ensuring that they understand about it.”

But then Palmer says the education needs to go back further, to new parents who should receive information about staying safe online when they leave hospital after their child is born. “It starts from within the womb,” Palmer urged.

As they grow up, Palmer asks that children be invited to talk with their parents about what they do online in the same way they do about offline activities, and only once the conversations about online and offline lives became equally important will progress be made.

Because of the internet and how easy it makes seeing inappropriate content, Palmer asks parents to understand that their children will grow up differently to those of their generation.

“We have to assume that children [now] will see things that children from my generation would never, ever see. So it’s no good saying ‘well my child probably won’t [see harmful material]’ because your child probably will.

“You need to equip your child so that they don’t feel bad about telling you about [what they see and do online]. And the most important thing in the whole world of child safety is that parents need to have a discourse with their online activity from the start.”

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Anti-bullying campaign empowering Loveland students http://www.dare.org/anti-bullying-campaign-empowering-loveland-students/ http://www.dare.org/anti-bullying-campaign-empowering-loveland-students/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 01:22:36 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16714 Loveland City Schools Human Resources Assistant Superintendent Keith Koehne, left, and Superintendent Chad Hilliker wear their “Be an Upstander” shirts from My Voice, My Choice’s anti-bullying campagin to empower bystanders. (Photo: Heather Higdon). From cincinnati.com. Loveland City Schools’ counseling department is working to make a culture of acceptance and caring in the district. Loveland High School […]

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Loveland City Schools Human Resources Assistant Superintendent Keith Koehne, left, and Superintendent Chad Hilliker wear their “Be an Upstander” shirts from My Voice, My Choice’s anti-bullying campagin to empower bystanders. (Photo: Heather Higdon).

From cincinnati.com.

Loveland City Schools’ counseling department is working to make a culture of acceptance and caring in the district.

Loveland High School Counselor Jamie Gordon and School Nurse Judy Leamy presented about the district’s anti-bully program, My Voice, My Choice at a Loveland School Board meeting.

My Voice, My Choice is meant to supplement the district’s iCare program, which deals with how to treat others in the classroom and how the staff can be role models, Leamy said.

Gordon said this year’s theme for the program is “Be an Upstander.” The program is working to empower bystanders and teaching them to stand up for others.

“My Voice, My Choice is empowering the bystanders to stand up to bullying and making good choices,” Leamy said.

She added the group behind My Voice, My Choice has been wanting to focus on bystanders since the program started four years ago.

“We have worked with the victims, we have worked with the bullies. But, we felt like we could make a huge difference if we empowered the bystander to stand up for anyone who is being a victim of bullying,” Leamy said.

Students who have been “upstanders” have been honored at basketball and football games and teachers in the program have been selecting students who will be featured in a video made by Chief Information Officer Heather Higdon.

Gordon said My Voice, My Choice is working on having a tolerance fair to further education students and the community.

The department has also been expanding Loveland Adult Mentor Program, or LAMP. The district has been working with Loveland Area Chamber of Commerce Director CeeCee Collins to bring in professional adults from the community to mentor students at the high school.

“Right now it exists only at the high school, but I would love to see it go beyond,” Gordon said.

Gordon said the students are pulled out of class for 45 minutes during the school day to have a mentoring session with their mentors.

“The kids need support in many different ways and if we can provide that for them their academic success is going to improve, along with their graduation rate and audience,” Gordon said.

Superintendent Chad Hilliker thanked Gordon and Leamy for finding a way to help Loveland students beyond their academic achievements.

“There is nothing more than our students and making sure that not only do they do well academically, but also doing well socially with each other,” Hilliker said.

 

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Operation: Safe Community through the the Drug Dealer Eviction Program http://www.dare.org/operation-safe-community-through-the-the-drug-dealer-eviction-program/ http://www.dare.org/operation-safe-community-through-the-the-drug-dealer-eviction-program/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 01:11:27 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16709 From wreg.com. Kicking drug dealers out of Memphis neighborhoods is one of the priorities of Operation Safe Community. The Drug Dealer Eviction Program lets residents help police identify drug dealers where they live. Assistant District Attorney Paul Hagerman is the Chief Prosecutor of the D.A.’s Organized Crime Prosecution Team. He takes the lead on cases involving […]

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From wreg.com.

Kicking drug dealers out of Memphis neighborhoods is one of the priorities of Operation Safe Community.

The Drug Dealer Eviction Program lets residents help police identify drug dealers where they live.

Assistant District Attorney Paul Hagerman is the Chief Prosecutor of the D.A.’s Organized Crime Prosecution Team.

He takes the lead on cases involving the Drug Dealer Eviction Program.

The Drug Dealer Eviction Program offers citizens a safe way to help law enforcement identify drug dealers in their neighborhoods.

This is a collaborative effort between CrimeStoppers, Memphis Police, the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office and Memphis Area Neighborhood Watch, as well as local realtors and landlords.

To anonymously report a suspected drug dealer in your neighborhood, call 528-CASH.

Operation Safe Community

  • For more information:
  • (901) 527-2600

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Piedmont students graduate from D.A.R.E. http://www.dare.org/piedmont-students-graduate-from-d-a-r-e/ http://www.dare.org/piedmont-students-graduate-from-d-a-r-e/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 00:55:45 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16700 From Rapid City Journal. The Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) culmination ceremony for the fifth grade students at Piedmont Valley Elementary School was held last week with 66 students participating. The 10-week class was taught by Meade County Deputy Sheriff David Moore, who has been a D.A.R.E. instructor since for 13 years. The Meade County […]

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From Rapid City Journal.

The Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) culmination ceremony for the fifth grade students at Piedmont Valley Elementary School was held last week with 66 students participating.

The 10-week class was taught by Meade County Deputy Sheriff David Moore, who has been a D.A.R.E. instructor since for 13 years. The Meade County Sheriff’s office has offered D.A.R.E. lessons in Meade School District since 1988.

Moore and the fifth grade teachers selected the following three personal commitment essays to be read at the culmination ceremony.

Emmalyn BrantDARE Report

By Emmalyn Brant

It has been a privilege to be in D.A.R.E. Why do I like D.A.R.E.? I like D.A.R.E. because I learned different facts about tobacco use and what happens to people when they do drugs.

D.A.R.E. isn’t just about what happens to people when they use tobacco. That’s what I thought at first. I also learned how to deal with stress, use communication correctly, and how to deal with bullying.

A good way to deal with stress is counting to ten. Great ways to communicate with someone when they are teasing is to say please stop and try not to yell or scream at them. One way to deal with bullying is to tell a teacher or an adult. I also learned what a health effect is. Some people think that it is just what happens to your health in general. A health effect is really a result of using a drug.

In D.A.R.E. I also learned something called the D.A.R.E. Decision Making Model. You are probably wondering what that is. D – is to define the problem or challenge that you are dealing with. A – is to assess the choices you have. R – is to respond to make the decision you think is best. E – is to evaluate. Did you make a good decision? What do those letters spell? D.A.R.E. I plan to use the D.A.R.E. Decision Making Model when I have a difficult decision to make.

In D.A.R.E. I also learned how to make safe and responsible choices. Some of the choices I have already made are not to do drugs, use tobacco, or smoke, I learned how to make little choices, like not to cheat on a test or skipping school or even smaller choices like taking care of my siblings. I know these choices will help me later in my life.

Braelyn JuveMy D.A.R.E. Report

By Braelyn Juve

Did you know more than 400,000 Americans die from tobacco-related deaths each year? I think D.A.R.E. was really fun most of the time. I think everybody should try D.A.R.E.

I learned a great deal of things in D.A.R.E. One thing we learned about was pressure and stress, like if your friends try to pressure you into doing something you might get stressed out. We also learned about bullying in one lesson. One time we did an activity where we were given a situation and then we went to certain places for how the situation made us feel. Once my friends and I did a little play to show people not to use and get things like drugs from strangers. We were all super heroes except for Christopher who was a villain trying to sell us drugs.

So we learned a thing called D.A.R.E. decision making model. I have not yet used it, but I might use it in a decision like going to a friend’s house or on a family vacation,. The D.A.R.E. decision making model is where you define, assess, respond and evaluate the problem.

I might choose to use what I have learned in D.A.R.E. in dealing with stress. If your friends saw you doing something you didn’t want them to see you doing, first of all tell them why you are doing it in a kind and polite way, If they start laughing at you, just stay calm and ask then to stop. We also learned about ways to deal with bullying, If you are getting bullied or if a friend is getting bullied then what you can do is tell an adult or you can also do something about it yourself and tell the bully to stop hurting you or whoever is getting bullied.

Carlie SchlosserD.A.R.E Report

By Carlie Schlosser

I really liked D.A.R.E. because it was a lot of fun. One thing I liked was the D.A.R.E. song. I also liked Retro Bill because he was so funny, and taught us about safety too. I really enjoyed the D.A.R.E. song because it was catchy, and fun to sing and dance, too.

I learned a lot; where do I start. I was very interested in learning about drugs. My favorite part was learning how drugs get to your brain cells. I’m so glad I got to learn about it. I had no idea drugs could do that.

I enjoyed learning about the five W’s of reporting bullying. I didn’t even know it existed. Now that I know what it is, I think it is amazing. It is going to help me a lot. I will try hard to stop bullying.

I also learned about the signs of stress. That has helped me a lot. My family deals with a lot of stress. Now I know when they are stressed out. I hope to help them get through their stress and be more understanding.

I also really liked learning about safe and responsible choices. It was good to learn what will happen if you make certain choices. It will help me make better informed decisions and that is pretty cool.

The D.A.R.E. decision making model means the following. The D means define the problem. A stands for assess. R means respond. And last, but not least, E means evaluate. It is pretty cool. I will use this model for a lot of things.

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D.A.R.E. Role Model program starts at The Providence School http://www.dare.org/d-a-r-e-role-model-program-starts-at-the-providence-school/ http://www.dare.org/d-a-r-e-role-model-program-starts-at-the-providence-school/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 00:41:12 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16697 Four Providence School D.A.R.E. Role Models helped serve a Thanksgiving meal at Creekside apartments in Nicholasville last week. From left are Samantha Brown, Austin Hood, Christina Lemay and Jacob Hogue. From The Jessamine Journal. High-school students at The Providence School have a new chance to give back after a D.A.R.E. Role Model program began this fall. […]

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Four Providence School D.A.R.E. Role Models helped serve a Thanksgiving meal at Creekside apartments in Nicholasville last week. From left are Samantha Brown, Austin Hood, Christina Lemay and Jacob Hogue.

From The Jessamine Journal.

High-school students at The Providence School have a new chance to give back after a D.A.R.E. Role Model program began this fall.

The Drug Abuse Resistance Education program features curriculum for fifth-graders and seventh-graders in Jessamine County public schools, and students at East Jessamine and West Jessamine high schools have had role-model programs to serve as examples to their younger peers. But until October, that option wasn’t available to Providence high-schoolers.

“This is an alternative school that’s combined with East and West students, and I just wanted to provide them something here that they may have lost when they came over here, just give them a chance to feel like they’re giving back to their communities,” Nicholasville police officer Clint Newton said. Newton has been stationed at Providence as the school-resource officer since December 2013.

Newton opened the program up to any high-schoolers interested in joining who were drug-free and not in trouble at school. He said he recruited some students and asked them to refer friends, with about 15 applications taken. The current total of six students in the group is not small given that the school has only about 80 high-schoolers, Newton said.

“This year is the first we’ve had it,” he said. “I hope that the rest of the students can see all the fun that my DARE role models are having and the great things they’re doing, and maybe it will keep growing each year.”

The goal is to have one meeting or one activity a month. Providence students have already traveled to the Creekside apartments in Nicholasville to help serve a Thanksgiving dinner, and they plan to serve another meal at Rose Terrace in December. From January on, Newton wants the activities to be driven by the students.

“My purpose is to give the kids an idea of what it’s like to give back to someone,” Newton said. “They’re young; they’re used to always having the old ‘give me, give me, give me’ attitude, and I want them to see what it’s like to give back to someone who’s even less fortunate than they are.”

Students at the alternative school often find themselves with negative labels in the community, Newton said, but the role-model program has provided them a new way to be helpful and be viewed in a different light.

“The students blew me away on how giving and humble they were with what they were doing,” he said. “To me, that means a lot that they’re out there; they’re being helpful; they’re not being judged as bad kids. They’re really pleased and glad with what they’re doing.”

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School policies in need of change for kids’ sake http://www.dare.org/school-policies-in-need-of-change-for-kids-sake/ http://www.dare.org/school-policies-in-need-of-change-for-kids-sake/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 00:31:51 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16694 Do school policies help keep students from partaking in pot, alcohol or drugs? One parent says ‘No,’ and advocates for change. From Journal of the San Juan Islands. By Kathleen Bartholomew. Special to the Journal. I made a terrible mistake. I knew my child’s friends and where she was every minute of the day. But I […]

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Do school policies help keep students from partaking in pot, alcohol or drugs? One parent says ‘No,’ and advocates for change.

From Journal of the San Juan Islands.

By Kathleen Bartholomew.

Special to the Journal.

I made a terrible mistake.

I knew my child’s friends and where she was every minute of the day. But I made a bad assumption. I thought she was safe at school. I was wrong.

This erroneous assumption has put my loved one on an entirely different trajectory, introducing her to a world of drugs at 14.

How can a straight “A” student’s promise of a bright future be suddenly altered just weeks after high school has started? What are the conditions the adults around her support or ignore that allow this to happen?

When we legalized marijuana for adults, did we intend to extend that to our children as well? If so, no need to read on.

A student with low self-esteem and a high need for being accepted was easy prey for upper-classmen who supplied marijuana at lunchtime. All freshmen are a vulnerable group as they transition to high school; it is our responsibility as parents and leaders to provide the safest conditions possible during this phase.

Drug use in and during school hours must be addressed if we are ever to meet our most fundamental ethical obligation to keep our children safe. Without a strong counter to the blaring culture of drug permissiveness in our youth, any parent’s ability to stem the tide of early drug usage and to provide reasonable conditions for good choices will be severely challenged.

For starters, the open campus policy for freshman must be repealed. School policies on drug use and bullying are ineffective. These well-thought-out intentions mean nothing to me—they can’t erase the past or pave the way to a better future.

When I notified a coach of marijuana use in students playing extra-curricular activities I was told, “The policies don’t allow us to infringe on individual rights and do drug testing.” Since when do minors’ rights supersede parental responsibilities to protect our youth until they are physically capable of recognizing the consequences of their own actions?

Hallway signage mocks the current reality: “Drug Free Zone”. It’s not that you can’t use drugs at school. The reality is simply that you can’t get caught using them.

And the saddest part of all is that this is nothing new. Denying this reality makes us all complicit.

While the goal is not to protect our children from ever being exposed to drugs, and the strong make wise choices, in the end peer pressure is too powerful a force to resist, especially in a small community where the threat of ostracism from the group leaves no other options.

Better policies would help establish the conditions for success while the frontal cortex’s of youth are still developing. For example, random drug testing.

A study directed by the National Center for Education Evaluation of over 4,700 high school students involved in extracurricular activities found that students reported less substance use when subjected to random drug testing.

Without consequences and with ineffective policies, drug use among juveniles will proliferate in our state. Our policies are useless. Parents are naïve to think their children are safe, and administrators are powerless without community support.

The current system is so mis-wired that faculty can be searched and tested at any time—but not students.

Am I the only one that finds this fact disturbing? Every single one of us has a role to play.

We need courageous leaders who have the wisdom and insight to acknowledge that our current policies on juvenile drug use are inadequate, administrators, teachers and coaches who require random drug testing, parents who demand drug free schools, and citizens who understand that improvements simply cannot happen without additional dedicated resources.

Without this concerted effort, it will only be a matter of time before we will all feel the effect of this downward spiral.

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West Deptford police receive $30K private donation toward D.A.R.E., youth programs http://www.dare.org/west-deptford-police-receive-30k-private-donation-toward-d-a-r-e-youth-programs/ http://www.dare.org/west-deptford-police-receive-30k-private-donation-toward-d-a-r-e-youth-programs/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 00:20:57 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16691 Pictured from left to right are West Deptford Police Chief Samuel DiSimone III,Timeshare Legal LLC owner Christian Highlander and Cpl. John Craig, president of the West Deptford Police Athletic League. Highlander on Friday, Nov. 21, 2014, donated $30,000 toward the departments youth outreach programs. (Courtesy of the West Deptford Police Department) From NJ.com. WEST DEPTFORD […]

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Pictured from left to right are West Deptford Police Chief Samuel DiSimone III,Timeshare Legal LLC owner Christian Highlander and Cpl. John Craig, president of the West Deptford Police Athletic League. Highlander on Friday, Nov. 21, 2014, donated $30,000 toward the departments youth outreach programs. (Courtesy of the West Deptford Police Department)

From NJ.com.

WEST DEPTFORD TWP. — The West Deptford Police Department will have six times their normal budget for its youth outreach programs, including D.A.R.E. and its Police Athletic League (PAL), thanks to a single, $30,000 donation from a local business.

Christian Highlander, owner of Timeshare Legal LLC, located on Grove Road, wrote out the $30,000 check on Friday after meeting with West Deptford Chief Sam DiSimone and Cpl. John Craig, president of the township PAL. According to Sgt. John Chambers, Highlander reached out to the department after seeing flyer the police department had mailed to all local businesses asking for donations.

“Our PAL includes all of the ways we connect with the youth in our community, and funds the D.A.R.E program, the junior academy, the fishing trip held every year and the explorers program we plan to create here,” said Chambers on Monday. “We sent out a mass mailing to all of the businesses registered in West Deptford, in hopes of getting, at most, a couple thousand dollars in donations.

“All I can say is that we’re floored,” Chambers added. “We’ve just been overwhelmed with the support received from the community.”

According to the sergeant, the police department receives about $5,000 annually from the funds provided to West Deptford from the countywide Municipal Alliance — $4,000 specifically for D.A.R.E. and another $980 for other PAL activities. While that amount has typically been supplemented by private donations, this was the first year the department had formally sought extra funds with a formal letter to businesses.

Highlander on Monday said he was moved to donate after being “shocked” to learn about the current dearth of funding for the programs.

“I wasn’t aware there was a lack of funding — I figured all that stuff was taken care of,” he said. “I was shocked to find out that it was just $4,000 per year for all the drug awareness work that D.A.R.E. was doing, and that they were leaning on businesses for help.”

He later added: “We also donated because it’s Thanksgiving and we’re in a good mood.”

Timeshare Legal LLC, which employs about 40 people in West Deptford, helps clients cancel contracts for time share properties they no longer wish to maintain, according to Highlander.

While the business is by no means one of the larger companies in the township, Highlander said the sizable donation to the police was well within its means.

“We’ve done very well,” he said. “One of the things about not being a huge company, is that we’re family owned and don’t have to answer to shareholders.

“This was a great opportunity to give back to the community.”

Highlander’s $30,000 check is the second major contribution the township community has made toward the police department this month. Two weeks ago, police announced that members of the community had raised more than $12,000 in little more than 24 hours toward the cost of veterinary care retired K-9 Judge.

As many as 130 people donated to the online fundraiser during that time.

Earlier this year, the West Deptford police have benefitted from the donation of a newK-9 vehicle from the owners of RiverWinds Restaurant, as well as $2,000 from energy company NuStar toward the creation of the department’s junior academy and a new website courtesy of Fronza Media.

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160 Hermantown Students Graduate From D.A.R.E. http://www.dare.org/160-hermantown-students-graduate-from-d-a-r-e/ http://www.dare.org/160-hermantown-students-graduate-from-d-a-r-e/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 00:14:54 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16688 From FOX 21 News. HERMANTOWN – After 10 long weeks of studying, 160 Hermantown 6th graders packed the gym to commit to a life above the influence during their D.A.R.E. graduation. Hermantown is the only school in the Twin Ports keeping the tradition alive. The program teaches kids the effects of peer pressure and drug […]

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From FOX 21 News.

HERMANTOWN – After 10 long weeks of studying, 160 Hermantown 6th graders packed the gym to commit to a life above the influence during their D.A.R.E. graduation.

Hermantown is the only school in the Twin Ports keeping the tradition alive.

The program teaches kids the effects of peer pressure and drug abuse.

“All those different electronic bullying that goes on now days; this talks about how to deal with those issues and why it’s such a horrible thing to do to each other,” said Hermantown Police Chief Jim Crace.

Police say they keep the program around because if it saves one kid, it’s worth their efforts.

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White Oak D.A.R.E. students recognized http://www.dare.org/white-oak-d-a-r-e-students-recognized/ http://www.dare.org/white-oak-d-a-r-e-students-recognized/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 00:10:24 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=16685 D.A.R.E. essay contest winners at White Oak Elementary School were recognized in a ceremony this week. Front Row from left to right: contest winners Oliva Wills, Lauren Bounds, Jeny Caldera-Rivera, Kayla Walker, and Izzy Michelkamp. Back Row from left to right D.A.R.E. Officer Scott Ator, Chief of Police Brent Dite, state Rep. John Anthony, D.A.R.E. […]

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D.A.R.E. essay contest winners at White Oak Elementary School were recognized in a ceremony this week. Front Row from left to right: contest winners Oliva Wills, Lauren Bounds, Jeny Caldera-Rivera, Kayla Walker, and Izzy Michelkamp. Back Row from left to right D.A.R.E. Officer Scott Ator, Chief of Police Brent Dite, state Rep. John Anthony, D.A.R.E. Officer Jessica Smith and Morris Mayor Richard Kopczick.

From Morris Daily Herald.

MORRIS – This week White Oak Elementary School and the Morris Police Department held the fifth-grade D.A.R.E. graduation ceremony at the school.

Principal Chris Maier welcomed parents and guests to the fifth grade D.A.R.E. graduation ceremony. The students participated in the 11-week program, which focuses on teaching the students life skills to help them make positive decisions as they grow up. The program further stresses how being drug free helps build a foundation for the rest of their lives, according to a news release from the police department.

State Rep. John Anthony, R-Plainfield, was the featured speaker. Anthony spoke about the importance of many of the lessons taught in the D.A.R.E. program. Anthony mentioned his days when he was a deputy sheriff when he worked in schools and spoke about the positive influence police officers can have in the lives of young people.

As part of the program, each student was required to write an essay on what they learned in D.A.R.E. and why they think it is important to avoid drugs and violence. A representative from each class was recognized and each read their essay as part of the ceremony. Class representatives received a D.A.R.E. sports ball and a D.A.R.E. essay winner medallion.

The class winners were Kayla Walker, Izzy Michelkamp, Olivia Wills, Lauren Bounds and Jeny Caldera-Rivera.

Each D.A.R.E. graduate also received a D.A.R.E. T-shirt, a D.A.R.E. pin, and a certificate recognizing their achievement. Patrol Officers Scott Ator and Jessica Smith were the instructors for the program this year.

 

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