D.A.R.E. America http://www.dare.org Empowering Children to Lead Safe and Healthy Lives Sun, 21 Sep 2014 22:48:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 MMC Middle & High School named “Iowa Safe Schools” http://www.dare.org/mmc-middle-high-school-named-iowa-safe-schools/ http://www.dare.org/mmc-middle-high-school-named-iowa-safe-schools/#comments Fri, 19 Sep 2014 02:04:58 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15745 From KTIV.com. MARCUS, Iowa (KTIV) – All of Wednesday’s activities were made possible by the “Iowa Safe and Supportive Schools” grant, which Marcus Meriden Cleghorn got about four years ago. It came after students filled out a survey, which showed high levels of bullying and harassment at the junior high and high school. Since getting […]

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From KTIV.com.

MARCUS, Iowa (KTIV) – All of Wednesday’s activities were made possible by the “Iowa Safe and Supportive Schools” grant, which Marcus Meriden Cleghorn got about four years ago. It came after students filled out a survey, which showed high levels of bullying and harassment at the junior high and high school. Since getting the grant, the school has seen a huge change in the attitude of the students, staff and community members.

KTIV News 4 Sioux City IA: News, Weather and Sports

“It’s really a great honor for our district and for all of our students and staff to say, you know, we’re doing great things here,” said Jennifer Rundall, coordinator for Iowa Safe and Supportive Schools. “It may be small, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be a great place for students to learn.”

The grant is funding activities that helps students improve relationships with their peers and with school staff. The school’s principal says that can help reduce the risk for bullying.

“Hopefully we can continue this grant moving forward,” said Michael Rundall, MMC Jr./Sr. High Principal. “This is our last year for the grant, but we’ve already looked at securing some additional funds to keep our coordinator on board, and to keep some of these activities so we can continue doing these types of things.”

On October 3rd, a ceremony will be held to celebrate the school’s induction as a certified Iowa Safe School. School officials say it’s the second school to achieve this level of safety for students.

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For Safety’s Sake, Parents Urged to Pay Attention to Kids’ Online Activities http://www.dare.org/for-safetys-sake-parents-urged-to-pay-attention-to-kids-online-activities/ http://www.dare.org/for-safetys-sake-parents-urged-to-pay-attention-to-kids-online-activities/#comments Fri, 19 Sep 2014 01:40:57 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15739 From Fox 31 Denver. DENVER — After a Longmont man was arrested for allegedly kidnapping a 14-year-old girl from Connecticut and then bringing her all the way back to Colorado with him, your family’s safety is top of mind. Police say the man met the girl online. Local law enforcement agencies remind parents to always […]

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From Fox 31 Denver.

DENVER — After a Longmont man was arrested for allegedly kidnapping a 14-year-old girl from Connecticut and then bringing her all the way back to Colorado with him, your family’s safety is top of mind.

Police say the man met the girl online.

Local law enforcement agencies remind parents to always keep an eye on what your child does online, especially because the sites they communicate on are ever changing.

A special investigator for the Jefferson County District Attorney’s office has arrested nearly 800 suspected sexual predators in the past 19 years. He says these predators will pretend to be anyone to get at their victims.

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Playful Banter or Bullying — Whose Perception Matters? http://www.dare.org/playful-banter-or-bullying-whose-perception-matters/ http://www.dare.org/playful-banter-or-bullying-whose-perception-matters/#comments Fri, 19 Sep 2014 01:23:13 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15736 By Deborah Temkin, Senior Research Scientist, Child Trends. From The Huffington Post. How do we define and measure bullying? This is the question that continues to plague bullying prevention researchers, policymakers, and advocates alike. In his latest blog post, Dr. Justin Patchin ponders on the interactions between his adult friends, who actively tease, mock, and exclude each […]

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By , Senior Research Scientist, Child Trends.

From The Huffington Post.

How do we define and measure bullying? This is the question that continues to plague bullying prevention researchers, policymakers, and advocates alike. In his latest blog post, Dr. Justin Patchin ponders on the interactions between his adult friends, who actively tease, mock, and exclude each other, and suggests that perhaps some of our traditional techniques of measuring bullying, such as by asking youth if they’d ever been called mean or hurtful names, may be mis-capturing these friendly interactions.

As Patchin writes:

“Often our research approaches don’t allow us to accurately distinguish between good-natured ribbing and malevolent meanness. As I have argued previously, I don’t believe that bullying can be done unintentionally. Even though someone’s feelings can certainly be hurt without intent, bullying by definition is deliberate.”

The issues Patchin ponders in his piece come down to a simple point: Whose perspective matters when it comes to bullying — an objective observer, the one engaging in the behavior, or the one who feels bullied? Patchin seems to argue that for behavior to be bullying, the one doing the bullying has to consciously intend to hurt someone else. In other words, for bullying to be bullying, it is the perpetrator’s perspective that matters. This makes sense when our primary intervention strategies revolve around punishing, criminalizing, or otherwise solely addressing the one doing the bullying. If youth are joking around with friends it’s easy to shrug off the behavior, but when we look deeper things become even more complicated.

In some of my early research, I looked at the friendship relations of bully-victim dyads. That is, my colleagues Dr. Scott Gest and Dr. Philip Rodkin asked 1st, 3rd, and 5th graders about who bullied whom in their class, along with asking about their personal friendships and other relations to their classmates. By aggregating the students’ perceptions on who bullied whom, we were able to identify frequently named bully-victim dyads. When we examined whether those dyads also named each other as friends, some unexpected findings emerged. Unsurprisingly, the majority (56%) did not name each other as friends. However, 13% were reciprocated friends and the remaining 31% were directed friendships, meaning one part named the other, but not vice-versa. Within that group, those perceived as the “bully” were significantly more likely to name the so-called “victim” as a friend. Although we cannot say for sure from these findings, it seems plausible that the “bullies” who name these perceived victims as friends may indeed think they are joking around, while their target and their classmates perceive the behavior quite differently.

This difference in perception between the person bullying and the person being targeted highlights why I think we need to start separating bullying perpetration and bullying victimization as two different behaviors and experiences, which may not directly align. To me, being bullied is a subjective experience that will vary between individuals. The same mean comment may have little effect on one child, but may be a significant trigger for another.

When I was growing up, for instance, I was constantly teased for being much shorter than my classmates, who took to calling me “Little Debbie” after the snack cake brand. Although I tried to embrace it in high school — even dressing up as the brand icon for Halloween — I still cringe when people call me Debbie. Are those that mistake my name bullying me? Absolutely not. Am I reminded about my past experiences when it happens? Yes. If kids are constantly teased about certain characteristics, or experiences, even in a joking way, they may still feel bullied, even if that was not the intent.

When we think about why we want to prevent bullying, we are often focused on the outcomes for those who are bullied, especially the most extreme outcomes of violent retaliation and suicide. Even if the broad question of, “have you been called mean names,” may not capture the intent behind those mean names, and may capture seemingly friendly interactions, it has been significantly correlated with the negative outcomes we’re concerned with, whether decreased academic achievement or increased risk of depression and anxiety. What was missing from Patchin’s observations of his friends was whether or not they were bothered by the behavior. Even Patchin points out that external laughter might be masking internal hurt. I bet at least one would say they were bothered by it, and if Patchin’s poker group had been a group of adolescents, at least one would have felt bullied.

My point is this: We need to stop arguing over the definition of bullying and trying to objectively indentify it. Instead, we need to listen when youth say they’ve been bullied. That doesn’t necessarily mean someone has intentionally bullied them and deserves to be punished. It does mean, however, that we need to find ways to support those who feel bullied and help such youth communicate that even if such behaviors are unintentional they are hurtful and should stop.

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Safe Community Awards Handed Out http://www.dare.org/safe-community-awards-handed-out/ http://www.dare.org/safe-community-awards-handed-out/#comments Fri, 19 Sep 2014 01:05:31 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15733 From Your News Now. Keeping a community safe takes more than just law enforcement and first responders. It also takes countless hours of community involvement from area residents. With the dedication of these volunteers and safety personnel Lima Allen County residents can rest a little easier as their safety and welfare is being looked after. Today […]

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From Your News Now.

Keeping a community safe takes more than just law enforcement and first responders. It also takes countless hours of community involvement from area residents.

With the dedication of these volunteers and safety personnel Lima Allen County residents can rest a little easier as their safety and welfare is being looked after. Today was a day to thank all of their efforts at the Lima Allen County Safe Community Coalition luncheon. Seven individuals and 3 organizations were recognized with awards of appreciation.

Hometownstations.com-WLIO- Lima, OH News Weather Sports

This is the 16th year for the safety luncheon in conjunction with the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 21 and the FOPA Lodge 8.

Winners are:

Fire Safety Award – Brooke Hedges – Perry Township Fire Department

Children Safety Award – CASA of Allen & Putnam Counties – Crime Victim Services

Youth Safety Award – Paula Stabler – Lima Memorial Hospital

School Safety Award – Detective Jack Miller – Shawnee Township Police Department

EMS Award – Lisa Nickles – Rhodes State College

Traffic Safety Award – Sgt. Fred DePalma – Allen County Sheriff’s Office

Motorcycle Safety Award – Pastor Bryan Bucher & Larry Inskeep – Community United Methodist Church Blessing of the Bikes

Special Recognition – Activate Allen County

Outstanding Citizen Award – Lima Allen County Neighborhoods in Partnership

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Anti-Marijuana Legalization Advocates Launch Campaign Against Initiative 71 http://www.dare.org/anti-marijuana-legalization-advocates-launch-campaign-against-initiative-71/ http://www.dare.org/anti-marijuana-legalization-advocates-launch-campaign-against-initiative-71/#comments Fri, 19 Sep 2014 00:28:43 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15729 From DCist. On November 4, residents of D.C. will have the opportunity to vote for an initiative that would legalize the possession and home cultivation of small amounts of marijuana. Initiative 71, proposed by the D.C. Cannabis Campaign, received more than 57,000 signatures to get on the November ballot, with little to no opposition during […]

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From DCist.

On November 4, residents of D.C. will have the opportunity to vote for an initiative that would legalize the possession and home cultivation of small amounts of marijuana. Initiative 71, proposed by the D.C. Cannabis Campaign, received more than 57,000 signatures to get on the November ballot, with little to no opposition during the signature-gathering effort. But now, a group has formed to urge District voters to oppose the initiative.

At a press conference outside of the Bible Way Church, the group, called T.I.E. D.C., formally launched their campaign. “T.I.E. D.C. is committed to protecting these communities and the rest of the city from the consequences of legalizing a third recreational drug,” said William Jones, the main organizer of the campaign.

The Post’s editorial board this week urged District voters not to rush to legalize marijuana. “With marijuana already decriminalized, there’s no reason for the District to rush the next step; why not at least give Colorado a bit more time to provide lessons?” the Post wrote. Williams praised the Post’s editorial, adding that “[we] don’t need to legalize a third drug.”

T.I.E. D.C. stands for “Two Is Enough D.C.,” as in alcohol and tobacco, substances the group says affects communities throughout the city. In their campaign, T.I.E. D.C. is attacking three central issues that marijuana legalization advocates often talk about: mass incarceration, youth and the taxation and regulation of legalized marijuana.

The racial disparity in marijuana-related arrests is one of the central platforms for the local marijuana legalization movement, but T.I.E D.C.says that this is a false dichotomy. “Legalization would further entrap our youth and prevent them from being responsible citizens,” Williams says. “We need to focus on education and healthcare, not more drugs.”

In July, D.C.’s marijuana decriminalization law went into effect, which makes the possession of small amounts of pot punishable by no more than a simple fine. Kathy Henderson, an ANC commissioner, emphasized T.I.E. D.C.’s position that marijuana decriminalization is enough. “If we vote yes on Initiative 71, we’ll all be smoking in this city, whether we want to or not,” she said, warning of the possibility of second-hand marijuana smoke.

Speaking at today’s press conference, Former Rep. Patrick Kennedy said that “while this is an issue for the residents of the District of Columbia, it’s also an issue for all of America, because we’re seeing this question all over this country. And it’s time that we as a community really understand what’s at stake.” Kennedy also talked about the potential for commercialization of marijuana if it’s legalized. Though Initiative 71 doesn’t include a taxation and regulation component, Kennedy spoke as if that’s a real threat, warning of the millions and billions of dollars corporations stand to gain from legalizing marijuana.

“We already have legalized drugs—alcohol and tobacco—and it’s no mystery how the corporate profit-motive system of legalized drugs works,” he said. “They work by preying on vulnerable people. They work by targeting young people.”

And that’s the third tier of T.I.E. D.C.’s platform: the message marijuana legalization sends to the youth of the city. According to Williams, the legalization of marijuana could create another “big tobacco” industry, which targets youth. “We need to make sure that our young people aren’t targeted by some slick Madison Avenue advertising firm that wants them to use legalized marijuana,” Kennedy added. “It just doesn’t make any sense to me.”

With T.I.E. D.C. officially launching their campaign today, Williams publicly challenged Cannabis Campaign chairman Adam Eidinger to a debate on these issues. Though Eidinger wasn’t present for the press conference, Dr. Malik Burnett, a local organizer with the Drug Policy Alliance who works closely with the Cannabis Campaign, was. “I think what we just witnessed was rhetoric from the ’80s,” he told DCist at the end of the press conference.

But with less than two months until the election, one question that lingers is why T.I.E. D.C. is just getting started now? The marijuana legalization effort began almost a year ago, and the Cannabis Campaign successfully organized a massive signature-gathering effort, with hardly any opposition, over the summer to get their initiative on the November ballot. “We should have organized earlier,” Williams admitted DCist, “but it’s better to start late than never.”

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Retired Officer Still Keeping Kids Safe http://www.dare.org/retired-officer-still-keeping-kids-safe/ http://www.dare.org/retired-officer-still-keeping-kids-safe/#comments Fri, 19 Sep 2014 00:12:02 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15726 Cyndy King, a retired St. Clair County Sheriff Department officer, reads from a book and talks to kids about staying safe at the G. Lynn Campbell Library in Kimball Township. (Photo: JEFFREY SMITH/TIMES HERALD). From The Times Herald. She’s retired, but former St. Clair County Sheriff Department DARE officer Cyndy King still feels it’s important to […]

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Cyndy King, a retired St. Clair County Sheriff Department officer, reads from a book and talks to kids about staying safe at the G. Lynn Campbell Library in Kimball Township. (Photo: JEFFREY SMITH/TIMES HERALD).

From The Times Herald.

She’s retired, but former St. Clair County Sheriff Department DARE officer Cyndy King still feels it’s important to talk to kids about staying safe.

King talked to kids Tuesday afternoon at G. Lynn Campbell Library, in Kimball Township, about the dangers of strangers.

King had been with the Drug Abuse Resistance Education program for 14 years. She retired in spring. During her 23 years at the sheriff department she also was on the drug task force and was a medical examiner special investigator.

“I would have normally talked to children about strangers in elementary schools during a separate presentation from the DARE program, which is specific to drugs,” King said. “It’s important to talk to kids to make them aware of strangers.”

King wants to teach elementary school kids to be cautious about talking to strangers and accepting gifts from strangers.

“I think it’s important to help kids, and even parents, with all safety issues,” she said. “From talking about strangers to drug prevention.”

The St. Clair County Sheriff Department eliminated its DARE program at the end of March 2014. The program cost about $96,000 a year to run and was cut due to lack of funding.

St. Clair County Sheriff Tim Donnellon said it was good to hear that King wants to continue to give to her community.

“(King) had an incredible career with the sheriff’s office,” Donnellon said. “Even in her retirement she wants to continue to give back and educate kids.”

St. Clair County Sheriff Department had provided DARE programming since 1989. Last year it provided services to 11 area high schools.

King said she was really disappointed when the DARE program was cut.

“I was upset because I truly believe in the program,” King said. “I would not be able to continue to teach the DARE program on my own because it has to be taught by a uniformed police officer, but I would be willing to still give presentations. I really feel strongly about the safety of kids.”

King said she thinks it’s a worthwhile cause to talk at local libraries, or to other organizations, about kids’ safety and drug prevention.

“I expect to do more after-school programs like this,” she said. “But it’s not only for children. We need to educate adults about the addictiveness of prescription pills. Some people don’t realize how addictive some prescriptions can be, and that can lead to trying illegal substances to supplement when the prescription runs out.”

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Daring to Make a Difference http://www.dare.org/daring-to-make-a-difference/ http://www.dare.org/daring-to-make-a-difference/#comments Fri, 19 Sep 2014 00:03:30 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15723 D.A.R.E. Officer Ty Viehmann focuses on GISD students. From The Graham Leader. Officer Ty Viehmann can typically be found roaming the hallways of the schools within Graham ISD, joking with kids and receiving plenty of hugs and high fives. He’s been in law enforcement for 18 years, 15 of those with the Graham Police Department, […]

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D.A.R.E. Officer Ty Viehmann focuses on GISD students.

From The Graham Leader.

Officer Ty Viehmann can typically be found roaming the hallways of the schools within Graham ISD, joking with kids and receiving plenty of hugs and high fives.

He’s been in law enforcement for 18 years, 15 of those with the Graham Police Department, and for the last three years he’s been doing his part to expand drug resistance education in local schools as a D.A.R.E. officer.

As a professional, he lives by the code of the D.A.R.E. (Drug Awareness Resistance Education) program. And like a true professional, he uses his antics and light-hearted demeanor to further the cause of a drug-free student body in Graham. Case in point, during his first year as a D.A.R.E. officer working with GISD for the 2012-2013 school year, he only worked with third and fifth graders.

This year, his third, thanks to some major cooperation and enthusiasm from Superintendent Lane Ledbetter and other key players, Viehmann now works with third, fifth, seventh and ninth graders.

“My job is kinda’ like being a grandparent,” he said. “I get to joke around and have fun with the kids, then I leave and let the teachers handle them for the rest of the day. The students… well, they seem to really enjoy their D.A.R.E. Officer. My main job is making people comfortable with cops. I want these kids to feel comfortable around me and to talk with me.”

Down at Graham High School on a Thursday morning, ninth grader Blanca Diaz talked about her own experiences with the now infamous Officer Viehmann. As she spoke, it was easy to see that he’s helped positively shift her perception.

“When officer Ty came to talk to us, it just clicked that we need to be more respectful and to just stand up for everyone even if you may or may not know them. Helping them could change their life,” Diaz related.

Matt Birdwell, GHS tennis coach and teacher, also discussed his first experience with D.A.R.E.

“I have only been to a D.A.R.E. program once,” Birdwell said. “But he gave a lot of practical examples of (why) these are the rules and these are the laws that we have. He even explained why we have a dress code, and this is why we put these things in place. This is why we put these policies in place, and I think the kids understand more why we have these rules.”

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Deputies Ride School Buses to Stress Safety http://www.dare.org/deputies-ride-school-buses-to-stress-safety/ http://www.dare.org/deputies-ride-school-buses-to-stress-safety/#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 04:46:11 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15716 Deputies from the Stark County Sheriff’s Office rode on buses with Plain Local Schools students Tuesday morning. Some also followed buses in their cruisers or enforced speed limits in school zones. Right: Sgt. Ron Perdue of the Stark County Sheriff’s Department stopped a motorist for a speed violation near GlenOak High School. From The CantonRep. […]

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Deputies from the Stark County Sheriff’s Office rode on buses with Plain Local Schools students Tuesday morning. Some also followed buses in their cruisers or enforced speed limits in school zones.

Right: Sgt. Ron Perdue of the Stark County Sheriff’s Department stopped a motorist for a speed violation near GlenOak High School.

From The CantonRep.

Joe Wickline wasn’t too worried when he saw a sheriff’s deputy on his school bus Tuesday morning.

“Because, I mean, there’s not really anything going on except being loud,” the eighth-grader said.

Deputies from the Stark County Sheriff’s Office rode on buses with Plain Local Schools students Tuesday morning. Some also followed buses in their cruisers or enforced speed limits in school zones.

The event is part of a week-long Operation School Bus project, designed to promote school safety. Deputies were on Tuslaw Local Schools buses Monday and planned to be in other districts — including Minerva Local Schools, Canton Local Schools and Marlington Local Schools — during the week.

Deputy Chad Smith started at 6 a.m. in the front seat of bus 56. He sat on the left side, so he could also observe whether cars stopped for the bus’ blinking sign as it picked up riders who live in the northeast section of the district.

As GlenOak High School students ambled on in the dark, Smith greeted a few by name and exchanged high-fives.

He’s been a school resource officer in the district for 10 years.

Susan Lynch, the bus driver, said she expected the students would be quieter and better behaved with a deputy watching.

“They’re all pretty good kids,” she said.

When the Oakwood Middle School kids started filling up the bus, Lynch told them the visitor was there to monitor their conduct.

The students started laughing and hollered, “Hi, Officer Smith!”

“Officer Smith, can you help put this window up?” some girls yelled.

Smith trekked back a few rows and slid the pane in place.

“We’ll see,” he said, testing the latch. “We’ll see if that stays up.”

Smith said it’s helpful for students to become familiar with law enforcement. If an officer arrives in the middle of the night for a domestic call or emergency, the kids hopefully feel comfortable with that person already.

“It’s just getting that positive reinforcement,” he said.

Outside Oakwood Middle School, Smith stepped off the bus while students practiced an evacuation. Across the street, two deputies had nabbed drivers for speeding in a school zone.

As Lynch picked up the elementary students, the noise level — and excitement level — rose. “There’s a cop on our bus!” they screamed. “We’re going to get arrested!” They proceeded to mostly ignore him.

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Unique Passwords are Key to Online Safety http://www.dare.org/unique-passwords-are-key-to-online-safety/ http://www.dare.org/unique-passwords-are-key-to-online-safety/#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 04:32:31 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15712 How to keep your online accounts from getting hacked. From www.kspr.com. SPRINGFIELD, MO – Last week a Russian website published the usernames and passwords for more than 5 million Gmail accounts, but the information didn’t come from Google. Instead, computer hackers used other, less secure sites to steal the information. One of the biggest mistakes people make […]

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How to keep your online accounts from getting hacked.

From www.kspr.com.

SPRINGFIELD, MO – Last week a Russian website published the usernames and passwords for more than 5 million Gmail accounts, but the information didn’t come from Google. Instead, computer hackers used other, less secure sites to steal the information.

One of the biggest mistakes people make is using the same password for all of their online accounts. Computer experts say you should treat your passwords like you do a key chain. On a key chain you have a seperate key for your house, car, and maybe even a shed. That’s the same way you should treat your online passwords.

If you use the same password for an online blog, as you do for your online banking, you could be giving hackers a master key to all of your online accounts.

If you think one of your online accounts has been hacked into, there are some steps you should take to stay safe.

“The first thing is to change your password immediately,” explained Steve Yates, owner of Computer Renaissance. “If it’s a bank or credit card, you should call them and put them on alert. They’re very good about calling if there’s fraud involved, they’ll do that randomly, but you have to be proactive.”

  • Computer experts say to keep your passwords safe you should:
  • Have a unique password for every account
  • Use long, complicated passwords
  • Avoid names, birthdays and other personal information
  • And change your passwords every several months

One of the hardest parts of having so many passwords is trying to remember them all. Yates said one way you can help with that, is by writing them all down in a notebook, but he said to be sure to keep that notebook tucked safely away.

Computer experts also say not to log into any of your financial or personal accounts when on public internet. That can leave you open to hackers wanting to steal your information.

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LAPD Pacific Area Launches Mobile Application to Enhance Community Safety http://www.dare.org/lapd-pacific-area-launches-mobile-application-to-enhance-community-safety/ http://www.dare.org/lapd-pacific-area-launches-mobile-application-to-enhance-community-safety/#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 04:15:30 +0000 http://www.dare.org/?p=15708 The Los Angeles Police Department’s Pacific Division has developed an exciting new safety and directory mobile application to equip its communities. From PRWeb. The Los Angeles Police Department’s Pacific Division has has taken a giant step in community policing by creating a mobile application to enhance the safety of the people they serve. Everyday people […]

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The Los Angeles Police Department’s Pacific Division has developed an exciting new safety and directory mobile application to equip its communities.

From PRWeb.

The Los Angeles Police Department’s Pacific Division has has taken a giant step in community policing by creating a mobile application to enhance the safety of the people they serve.

Everyday people ask Police Officers for safety tips. Others request direct phone numbers they can call to file a police report or to obtain a copy of a police report that they have previously filed. Many do not know what phone number to call to give anonymous tips, while others simply wish to know what crime trends are occurring in their community so they can take the necessary precautions to avoid becoming victimized.

“LAPD Pacific Safety & Directory App” was released on Google Android August 26, 2014 and just days ago on Apple ITunes.

You can download the app for free on your Smartphone at: LAPDPacificApp.com. Afterwards, use its easy “FAQ’s” navigation menu to:

  • Find out how to file/obtain a copy of a police report
  • Obtain a list of all pertinent phone numbers
  • Find our current crime trends in your community
  • Learn how to join/start a Neighborhood Watch
  • Find out what phone number to call or text to make an anonymous tip
  • Learn how and where to file a restraining order
  • Sign up your children for free LAPD leadership programs and more.

The application “Community Safety & Directory App” was created and designed by Los Angeles Police Officer III Tony Newsom who is also the developer of the recently released LAPD Cadet Program App.

The “LAPD Pacific Safety & Directory App” was built under the leadership of Captain Brian P. Johnson, Commanding Officer, LAPD Pacific Area and Captain Nicole Alberca, Patrol Commanding Officer, LAPD Pacific Division.

You can download the App for free on your Smartphone by visiting: LAPDPacificApp.com.

For more information concerning this application, please email: Officer Tony Newsom, LAPD, Pacific Area at: 26986@lapd.lacity.org

The post LAPD Pacific Area Launches Mobile Application to Enhance Community Safety appeared first on D.A.R.E. America.

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